Interior Architecture

Courses

  • Fall 2014

    ADVANCED COMPUTING: FUNDAMENTALS OF REVIT

    Students registering for this course should choose one of the two sections based on interest provided in the below section information: 2014FA Section 01 Advanced Computing:Fundamentals of Revit Instructor: tba Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as a digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. Revit is one of the most comprehensive and widely used BIM programs in the world. The software closes the gap between 3D geometry and building component data. This course will introduce students to Revit utilizing a hands-on approach. The class will introduce the essential concepts of the software through weekly class lectures/tutorials. Weekly assignments will allow students to use their knowledge to complete real-life design tasks. Hands-on exercises will also focus on software interface, creation of parametric families and creation of construction document sets.

    Software requirements: Rhino V5.0(Windows) and Grasshopper plug-in.
    Participants must have laptop with Windows, w/Parallels recommended for Mac users. Free student download of Revit available
    Major elective: BFA,MDes, MA
    INTAR majors only

    2014FA Section 02: Advanced Computing: Digital Fabrication Instructor: Eduardo Benamor Duarte The seminar will engage parametric design tolls to foster adaptability and change in the design and fabrication of the Interior environment. The class will revisit Interior Architecture tectonic principles to derive abstract geometrical principals for exploring the generation of new tectonic forms. Students will recursive mathematical processes in parametric modeling tutorials written in the Rhinocerose plug-in Grasshopper interface. The class will explore the acquired knowledge in a series of interior architecture components digitally modeled and fabricated with rapid prototyping and NCN machines.
    Software requirements: Rhino V5.0(Windows) and Grasshopper plug-in.
    Major elective: BFA,MDes, MA
    INTAR majors only

    ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIOS

    Choice of advanced design studios offered by the Department of Interior Architecture. Details & studio descriptions are made available to pre-registered students. Advanced Design (Lottery) Studio Presentations by teaching faculty will take place on Tuesday, September 9th and Thursday, February 12th.
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration
    Course-related Expenses: students who elect some advanced studios may incur expenses for course supplies or related travel. Anticipated costs will be announced during the lottery studio prsentations held in the department.

    ADVANCED DRAWING & COMPUTING TECTONICS

    This course focuses on the drawing as it serves to convey different design intentions. As a continuation of the basic drawing coursework in the MDes Summer Program, this course will explore advanced techniques in hand drawing and digital representation.
    Students successfully completing this course will be able to understand the construction of 3D drawings, develop sophisticated digital layouts with image processing software, create CAD based 2D architectural drawings and 3D models, and develop a 3D visualization of a design. The integration of 2D and 3D data, digital materials, as well as the basics of digital lighting and camera work will also be discussed.
    Major Requirement: MDes
    INTAR majors only

    APPLIED BUILDING SYSTEMS: ADAPTIVE REUSE

    This course approaches the subject of adaptive reuse through environmental issues, economic analysis and design. These fundamental concepts are applied in real-world projects of reuse to reduce negative impacts to the built environment.
    Course objectives include an understanding of energy and environmental context, the ability to develop schematic designs for energy efficient interventions in an existing building, the ability to perform basic analyses of the energy and economic performance of building measures and to apply course material to case studies of completed buildings.
    Students should develop familiarity with energy and environmental impacts associated with the built environment and the rationale for responsible design, energy modeling and calculations, passive and active lighting systems (including daylighting techniques and fenestration) and the thermal performance of buildings including the thermal envelope and passive and active heating systems.
    The course structure includes a midterm examination, case studies, an individual research paper and a final design project.
    Major Requirement: MA
    INTAR majors only

    BUILDING MATERIALS EXPLORATION

    This class introduces the student to different building materials, their properties and characteristics. Through a series of full scale construction projects and material making processes, the student will be asked to explore these materials and their potential in the design of interior structures.
    Major requirement: BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    BUILDING STRUCTURES, SYSTEMS, AND ADAPTIVE REUSE

    While introducing students to the principal concepts of structural design and mechanical systems, the course will attempt to provide a direct link to the built environment with focus on the rehabilitation, preservation and adaptive reuse of existing structures, both historical and contemporary. The presentation of case studies, focus on the structural and mechanical aspects of students' individual studio projects and the excursion to at least one construction site will bridge the gap between class room and the world of building.
    Major requirement: BFA
    INTAR majors only

    DESIGN THESIS PREP

    The Design Thesis in the department of Interior Architecture is conceived as a three part sequence beginning with "Investigating Interiority", now positioned in the Spring semester of the penultimate year of the MDes program. Building on the theorectical understandings obtained during that prerequisite course, this semester is designed to assist students to identify a suitable thesis project. The discussions will refer to important precedents, many of which will have been identified during the earlier course. The students will be required to submit their proposals for their own self-choice design project. Through group discussion and individual interviews, outline proposals will be approved in principle, requiring each student to prepare a feasibility report for their proposed Design Thesis. The design phase will take place during the following Spring semester. The completed feasibility report will be submitted for evaluation at the end of the Fall semester.
    Major requirement:MDes
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    DRAWING FOR INTERIOR ARCH

    Introduction to means of representation of ideas for Interior Architecture through various types of drawings: orthographics, axonometrics, perspectives, freehand sketching and mixed media. Work will be done on site from existing structures as well as in the studio concentrating on concept development through drawing.
    Major requirement:BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    HISTORY OF ADAPTIVE REUSE

    This course will examine the major architectural personalities working in Europe (Italy, France, England, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands) and in North America in the period 1800 to 2010. Areas of study will include an examination of adaptive reuse related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to interior renovations, additions, transformations and other interventions of adaptive reuse. Other areas of study will include the development of architectural drawing, and the way in which designs often evolved through committees, or ongoing consultations among patrons, designers, administrators, and scholars. Attention will also be given to design theory, and the doctrines relating to site, orientation, proportion, decorum, and the commercial design market.
    This course will be conducted in seminar form with discourse and discussions at the graduate level.
    Major Requirement: MDes
    INTAR majors only

    History of Interior Architecture I: 1400-1850

    This course will examine the major architectural personalities working in Europe (Italy, France, England, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands) and in North America (the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico) in the period 1400 to 2009. Areas of study will include an examination of interior design related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to interior additions and renovations and other interventions. Other areas of study will include the development of architectural drawing, and the way in which designs often evolved through committees, or ongoing consultations among patrons, designers, administrators, and scholars. Attention will also be given to design theory, and the doctrines relating to site, orientation, proportion, decorum, and the commercial design market.
    A general background in the history of Art and Design is desirable but not mandatory.
    Major Requirement for BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Art History credit for Interior Architecture majors
    Liberal Arts elective credit for nonmajors on a space available basis.

    HUMAN FACTORS: ERGONOMICS AND ACOUSTICS

    This course will focus on factors influencing the design of the interior environment through exploring issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design).
    It will be complemented by a study of acoustics as it relates to the relationship between the built environment and sound; predicting and designing for the acoustic performance of spaces, and executing acoustic measurements (impulse response, reverberations).
    Major Requirement: MDes
    INTAR majors only

    INTRO TO DESIGN STUDIO II

    This course builds on the foundations gained in previous studio and course work by specifically furthering design development abilities. The studio will require the integration of the student's emerging knowledge of site analysis, mapping & documentation, innovative tectonics and systems, applicable theoretical issues, relevant cultural precedents, and precise material investigation into a cohesive design agenda. Major Requirement: MDes
    INTAR majors only

    INTRO TO INTERIOR STUDIES I

    This course, the first in a sequence, explores design principles through design problems involving the unique fundamental framework for the reuse of existing structures. The semester is arranged around several projects, providing access to the discipline from as many related perspectives. The project assignments require to visually and verbally convey clear design intent, think visually in two and three dimensions, formulate and develop abstract design concepts, discern relationships between design interventions and their physical and contextual setting and develop presentation skills to effectively communicate propositions and positions.
    Major requirement: BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    INTRO TO INTERIOR STUDIES III

    Building on the skills and knowledge developed during the first year in the Department, undergraduate students will focus their attention on a project which requires the hypothetical remodeling of an existing building of some complexity for a proposed new use.
    Major requirement: BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department; course not available via web registration

    SCHEME DETAILING

    This course explores the principles of construction and design detailing. The student will detail the construction of a previously designed studio project. Finish materials, window treatments, light fixtures, and furniture will be selected. Construction methods and materials will be examined as well as the performance and appearance retention of finishes. Individual presentations will be made on a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials.
    Major requirement: BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    STRUCTURES & MATERIALS

    This lecture course is designed to familiarize students with structural principles and systems as they relate to the study of interior architecture. The course will examine the performance and composition of various structural systems, including wood, lightweight metal, steel, masonry, and concrete structures. To gain an understanding of structures, their materials and components in adaptive reuse, we will visit local examples in the built environment.
    Major requirement: MDes
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    THEORY OF ADAPTIVE REUSE

    Routinely defined as "transforming an unused or underused building into one that serves a new use," the practice of adaptive reuse is rich and varied.
    This lecture course will examine the pluralism of this practice through weekly lectures that focus on these varying aspects. The course will also focus on the differences in the implementation of this practice from countries in Northern Europe with its longstanding regard for reuse to countries with emerging practices such as China and Korea.
    The lectures will include case studies of buildings, unbuilt projects, and urban assemblages, which will be contextualized in through the common themes which are critical to understanding reuse.
    Requirements: weekly lectures and discussions, readings, a mid-term examination and a final paper.
    Major Requirement:MA, MDES
    INTAR majors only

    Wintersession 2015

    Int|AR JOURNAL: RESEARCH AND CRITICAL ANALYSIS

    The Kiosk as Metaphor
    This multidisciplinary seminar taught by Ernesto Aparicio (design, graphics, way finding) will conceptualize, design and possibly implement experimental urban installations in 2D and 3D ("The Kiosk as Metaphor"). Several site visits, discussions and presentations with leading community members on the key topics: -Heritage Preservation, -Tourism, -Experience and -Art + Culture will create relevant first hand data for design and a following article in Volume 06 of Int|AR, the Journal on Interventions and Adaptive Reuse.
    Open to All Grads

    INTRO TO DESIGN FOR MUSEUM/EXHIBITS

    This combination of seminar and studio work presents an opportunity for students to investigate issues and ideas that concern museums as they develop increasingly sophisticated stratagems for engagement with the communities they serve. In some cases these communities may be very local, and in others, the primary audience consists of urbane international visitors whose travel itinerary will always include visits to the world's greatest museums. In such cases, orthodox text-based captions of objects on display often do not properly communicate essential aspects, and as the expectations of museum visitors increase exponentially relative to their everyday engagement with the digital world, designers, museum educators and curators are becoming ever more resourceful as they compose and choreograph narrative environments. The studio will proceed through a series of short design exercises, each of which will introduce a different approach to the forming of a narrative environment, connecting with the museum visitor through diverse means of communicating complex ideas.
    Through these design exercises, students in the studio will increase their understandings of museum design in the twenty-first century and be properly equipped to engage in meaningful dialog with those curators /clients whose task is to project their collections and special exhibitions as effectively as possible. We will discuss fine distinctions between notions of propaganda and a purely didactic approach to exhibit design. We will consider questions of how the essential aspects of a collection can be communicated most effectively, and how complex ideas can be effectively encapsulated for a general audience.
    This studio is essentially one half of a six-credit experience co-taught with Eric Anderson (see HAVC-7013 Exhibition: History and Theory) for three credits each. Please note: It is NOT possible to register for one of these three credit courses without the other, as they are co-taught and intimately connected. Work on the design exercises will take place on one studio day per week over the whole semester.

    INTRO TO INTERIRO ARCHITECTURE FOR NON-MAJORS

    This course is primarily intended to provide some insight into the design objectives of the studio projects of the undergraduate and graduate degree programs of Interior Architecture at RISD. As a studio introduction to Interior Architecture for non-majors, the course will focus on the spatial design concerns of the department focusing on how one carves, creates and occupies built space. Projects will explore the realm of work that begins with an architectural volume and transforms it from the ill-used or obsolete, to new purpose and viability, presented in drawings and models.

    PORTFOLIO PREP & PRODUCTION

    This class is primarily intended as a means for students in their year of graduation from the Department to prepare their portfolios for interviews with potential employers and for entry to the professional world of design. Using computer programs which will build upon knowledge already gained, the course will be helpful to all those who wish to gain some knowledge of techniques which will enhance the presentation of design work already completed. This is an essential aspect of the class, and should not be regarded as an opportunity to extend further design work on earlier studios, although some refinement of existing drawings will be necessary. InDesign, Illustrator & Photoshop software required.
    Graduating Interior Architecture majors only

    SET DESIGN STUDIO

    The class seeks to examine set design within a studio environment that is as close as possible to that of the profession, allowing students the opportunity to work on numerous productions in the design roles within theatre and opera. Relevance will be attached to the exploration of visual solutions that are viscerally grounded in the text. Script analysis will be thorough and ongoing. Group participation in this process is essential. Students will be expected to read and research one to two plays per week. All sets will be modeled, with fluctuating levels of completion.
    Architecture & Design Majors Only
    Class meets off-campus at Brown University, 50 John Street Studio

    Spring 2015

    ADAPTIVE REUSE DESIGN STUDIO

    As the final studio in the year-long sequence of studios and seminars focusing on the practice of adaptive reuse, the student will have the opportunity to demonstrate these principles and theories in a complex design project of reuse.
    With a local city as the setting for the project, students have access to the site and are able to observe and experience firsthand the constraints of an existing structure. Students will also have the opportunity to use city resources such as a city's Department of Planning and Development, Historic District Commission, RI State Council on the Arts, etc. This project will serve as a model for engaging other real-world adaptive reuse applications.
    This studio will be taught in conjunction with the 3-credit Adaptive Reuse Seminar, INTAR 2363.
    Major Requirement: MA
    INTAR majors only

    ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIOS

    Choice of advanced design studios offered by the Department of Interior Architecture. Details & studio descriptions are made available to pre-registered students. Advanced Design (Lottery) Studio Presentations by teaching faculty will take place on Tuesday, September 9th and Thursday, February 12th.
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration
    Course-related Expenses: students who elect some advanced studios may incur expenses for course supplies or related travel. Anticipated costs will be announced during the lottery studio prsentations held in the department.

    CODES AND DETAILS

    This class introduces the student to an overview of codes and it's implementation through construction details as related to the study of adaptive reuse. It will provide in depth focus on pertinent parts of local and national building codes that address issues affecting interior architecture such as egress, materials, planning, and accessibility. The student will be asked through quizzes as well as short design projects to implement these rules and regulations and to demonstrate a familiarity with the codes.
    Major requirement:MDes
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    DESIGN THESIS

    Required for students in the MDes degree program. Under the supervision of their degree project advisor, students are responsible for the preparation and completion of a fully articulated design proposal of their own choice, as described by their "Design Thesis Feasibility Report", submitted at the end of the Fall semester's Design Thesis Preparation class.
    Major requirement: MDes
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department; course not available via web registration

    ENERGY AND SYSTEMS

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study how distinct building systems are constructed to form a comprehensive whole. Through case studies, students will examine approaches to integrating a variety of systems, such as structural, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, acoustic, and communication systems. This course will focus on how interior architecture interfaces with existing buildings; the case studies will be of recent works that have altered existing building. Students will be required to use the shop and computers to execute their individual and group assignments.
    Major requirement: MDes
    Elective for undergraduate students; INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    FINAL STUDIO PROJECT SEMINAR

    This course will be held in conjunction to the final advanced studio of senior UG students and intends to expand the advanced studio project with individual additional design and research studies. Building upon the offered and selected advanced studio, the seminar engages the student with research and design studies that expand the final studio and deepen the research on the selected typology and topic of the parallel studio. This will involve expanded reading, group discussions, testing of typology studies, further conceptual development and a writing component . The seminar should conclude with a booklet and a common exhibit proposal representing a holistic proposal of a given topic. This seminar will work in conjunction to the final studio where all senior students from different advanced studio groups will meet, discuss their projects with their peers and work on individual basis with the instructor on above outlined topics. UG Students in their final year will have the opportunity to expand their final design investigation to a holistic project, create a final book and present the work in a final Department exhibit.
    Major elective, INTAR senior majors only

    GRAD ADAPTIVE REUSE SEMINAR

    This seminar will be taught in conjunction with a 6 credit Adaptive Reuse Studio, (INTAR 2362) in which the students explore design innovation and its relationship to the constraints of an existing site. The student will select a topic of research in conjunction with their design project, formulate propositions and develop them with a team of advisers.
    Evidence of such research will culminate in both written form and as part of the design proposal.
    Major Requirement: MA
    INTAR majors only

    HISTORY OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE II: 1850 to Present

    This course will examine the major designers working in the period 1850 to the present. Areas of study will include an examination of design related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to the history of interior interventions, additions and renovations.

    Other areas of study will include the development of architectural drawing and other presentation media, and the way in which designs often evolved through committees, or ongoing consultations among the patrons, designers, administrators, and scholars. Attention will also be given to design theory, and the doctrines relating to site, orientation, proportion, decorum, and the commercial design market.
    A general background in the history of Art and Design is desirable but is not mandatory.
    Major requirement for BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Liberal Arts elective credit for nonmajors on a space available basis.

    INTRO TO COMPUTING:INTAR

    The objective of this class is to learn basic digital techniques in spatial design. Students successfully completing this course should be able to develop sophisticated digital layouts with image processing software, create CAD based 2D architectural drawings and 3D models, and develop a 3D visualization of a design. In this course, we will also discuss the integration of 2D and 3D data, digital materials, as well as the basics of digital lighting and camera work.
    Major requirement: BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    INTRO TO INTERIOR STUDIES II

    This course further develops design principles from the first semester and introduces students to methodological thinking in the relationship between context, scale and use. Real site situations are introduced and students develop individual design processes associating topological relationships between the interior and exterior, at multiple scales of interventions. Students will have the opportunity to explore design issues through both traditional and computer generated design.
    Major requirement: BFA
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

    INVESTIGATING INTERIORITY

    This seminar is intended as a reinforcement of the central theoretical aspects of Interior Architecture in preparation for the self-choice Degree Project the following Spring. The seminar will assist the student to become more aware of those factors which will determine a successful outcome in terms of site and program for a design intervention with an existing building.
    The course will examine issues relating to the concept of interior architecture from the Early Modern era to the present day. Areas of focus will include an examination of design-related interventions regarding alterations, additions, restorations and conservation of interiors which will be studied in the context of their social, spiritual, philosophical, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Every week, select buildings will be presented as case studies that highlight the week's thematic issues regarding varied types of interior interventions.
    Also offered as INTAR 2379; Requirement for BIA and MIA;INTAR majors only
    Register into the course for which credit is desired

    PRINCIPLES OF ADAPTIVE REUSE

    This course approaches the subject of adaptive reuse through the understanding of the rules and methods of design interventions. Analysis and synthesis regarding construction methods, structure, use, scale and the regulations pertaining to existing structures will be explored.
    Building on the framework of the International Building Code for Existing Structures, this course also examines the feasibility of reuse as defined by construction regulations and practice.
    The semester will be based upon case studies of completed projects in adaptive reuse to demonstrate the principles of design and construction within the context of existing structures. Through this course, students develop an understanding for the design process necessary in implementation of adaptive reuse in the design profession.

    Assigned papers and projects through the semester require the understanding and implementation of these methods and regulations on projects of adaptive reuse.
    Major Requirement: MA
    INTAR majors only

    SPATIAL PERCEPTION: LIGHT & COLOR

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of color and light as it applies to spatial and visual perceptions in the built environment. It is an opportunity to study color theory in conjunction with light, lighting systems and the effect of light on color.
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department; course not available via web registration

    SPECIAL TOPICS:ADAPTIVE REUSE

    This course will address new trends, recent developments, avant-garde methodology, and technological innovations in adaptive reuse. The content will change from year to year.
    Major Requirement: MA
    INTAR majors only

    THEORY OF ADAPTIVE REUSE

    Routinely defined as "transforming an unused or underused building into one that serves a new use," the practice of adaptive reuse is rich and varied.
    This lecture course will examine the pluralism of this practice through weekly lectures that focus on these varying aspects. The course will also focus on the differences in the implementation of this practice from countries in Northern Europe with its longstanding regard for reuse to countries with emerging practices such as China and Korea.
    The lectures will include case studies of buildings, unbuilt projects, and urban assemblages, which will be contextualized in through the common themes which are critical to understanding reuse.
    Requirements: weekly lectures and discussions, readings, a mid-term examination and a final paper.
    Major Requirement:MA, MDES
    INTAR majors only

    THEORY SEM.: INVESTIGATING INTERIORITY

    This seminar is intended as a reinforcement of the central theoretical aspects of Interior Architecture in preparation for the self-choice Design Thesis the following Spring. The seminar will assist the student to become more aware of those factors which will determine a successful outcome in terms of site and program for a design intervention with an existing building.

    The course will examine issues relating to the concept of interior architecture from the Early Modern era to the present day. Areas of focus will include an examination of design-related interventions regarding alterations, additions, restorations and conservation of interiors which will be studied in the context of their social, spiritual, philosophical, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Every week, select buildings will be presented as case studies that highlight the week's thematic issues regarding varied types of interior interventions.
    Major requirement: MDes
    INTAR majors only
    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration
    Also offered as LAEL LE08 for Liberal Arts elective credit. Register into the course for which credit is desired.