Graduate Studies Electives

Overview

The division of Graduate Studies offers studios and seminars designed to provide students with opportunities for interdisciplinary study and the exploration of issues and practices of interest to advanced-level students in all disciplines. The courses provide opportunities to:

  • explore areas of interest beyond program requirements
  • collaborate on projects with students from diverse backgrounds
  • connect with the larger graduate student population
  • ground your own studio explorations in the context of contemporary theory and practice

Not all of the following courses are offered every year, but this list gives a sense of the kinds of questions and conversations supported by the Graduate Studies curriculum. All GS electives are open to any graduate student, without prerequisites.

Courses

  • GRAD-162G

    ADVANCED RESEARCH: PUTTING YOUR WORK IN CONTEXT
    Being able to situate your work with respect to relevant social, political, historical, and material contexts (including processes and techniques) is an important skill for any artist/designer. In this advanced research seminar, which is open to graduate students from all disciplines, you have the opportunity to pursue academic research related to the degree project/thesis. The goal of this research is to help you develop and refine your ability to contextualize different aspects of your work and to articulate the interventions you intend to make by making it. Although writing is a regular and important component of the course, this is not a thesis-writing course. It is, rather, a course in which the thinking, writing, and making you do should contribute to the shape of the degree project/thesis.
    Graduate Elective - seminar
  • GRAD-651G

    ARTISTS' WRITINGS
    This seminar explores the various ways modern and contemporary artists have written about their work from the 1950s to the present. By examining statements, journals, notebooks, interviews, diaries, essays, and critical texts by a variety of artists - spanning Robert Motherwell, Barnett Newman, and Jack Tworkov through to Andy Warhol, Donald Judd, and Eva Hesse - as well as more recent figures such as Jenny Holzer, Kara Walker, Fred Wilson, and the Critical Art Ensemble, the differing genres that artists have used to describe their work and that of others begins to emerge. Specific consideration is given to the ways in which these literary forms structure the content and meanings of artists' work. The course is constructed around in-class discussion of assigned texts, slide lectures, and visits to each student's studio. The seminar aims to extend the range of texts currently read by students, and additionally serves as a springboard for the development of the graduate thesis.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-146G

    BIODESIGN STUDIO
    This course explores aspects of human knowledge of living systems providing a research-based approach to such topics as Biodesign, Biomimicry in Materials, and the cognitive phenomena of Biophyllia. The affinity we have as humans to natural living systems is in everything: from the spaces we inhabit to the metaphors we employ in order to understand complexity in general. Using the facilities and resources of the Edna Lawrence Nature Lab, graduate students create opportunities to experiment, observe, and learn about the networked aspects of living materials and processes.
    One course objective is to establish bridges between art and design practices and scientific avenues of knowledge that seek to understand and represent properties of living systems. In the process of making these connections, a critical approach is taken to what we think of as knowledge and its communication.
    Graduate elective - studio
  • GRAD-055G

    COLLEGIATE STUDIO: LEARNING CENTERED TEACHING
    Using RISD as a site for the exploration of strategies for studio-based teaching and learning is the goal of the course. It is designed for students who will be teaching during the course of study at RISD or who plan to teach after graduation. The course draws upon the varying expertise and teaching methodologies of RISD faculty and visiting faculty from other institutions to provide graduate students with models of practice. Learning to teach in a generative and attentive manner can bring teaching closer to one's studio practice. The course is composed of readings, reviews, discussion, project assignments, lectures, and peer presentations. The final outcome will be formation of a condensed teaching portfolio including a teaching philosophy, course proposals, a detailed syllabus, sample class assignments and assessment guides.
    This course may also be taken in any sequence with Collegiate Teaching: Preparation + Reflection.
    Graduate elective
    Also offered as ARTE 055G. Register into the course for which credit is desired.
  • GRAD-044G

    COLLEGIATE TEACHING: PREPARATION + REFLECTION
    How can we add to the future enrichment of our disciplines? How do we make our future teaching a more meaningful practice? This semester-long professional practice course is for artists, designers, architects, and educators and is designed for students who will be teaching during their course of study at RISD and or who plan to teach in higher education after graduation. The course draws upon the varying expertise and pedagogical practices of RISD faculty and guests from all disciplines to provide graduate students with models of teaching that can inform their development as future faculty. The goal of this seminar is to introduce graduate students to reflective teaching principles and to provide an orientation to the collegiate teaching and learning experience. The course is composed of readings, reviews, discussions and Individual Teaching Consultations (ITCs), where students engage in microteaching sessions and receive feedback from faculty and peer observers. The major products resulting from the course include a personal statement of teaching philosophy and a proposal for a course description and course syllabus.
    This course maybe also be taken in any sequence with Collegiate Studio: Learning-Centered Teaching.
    Graduate elective Also offered as TLAD-044G. Register into the course for which credit is desired..
  • GRAD-091G

    DESIGN AND THE DEVELOPING WORLD
    This seminar is for graduate students interested in exploring the role art and design can play in addressing social justice issues in vulnerable, under-resourced and often still-developing regions of the world. The course frames the international development debate and offers a critical look at changing attitudes in development theory over the past five decades. It explores some of the most innovative initiatives, especially those employing art and design in their strategies; and it examines what strategies communities themselves have used - those which often fall well below the radar screen of top-down international structures and programs. The seminar situates students' interests within the complexities and responsibilities that come with working in foreign cultures and discusses such engagement from ethical, sociological, political, communication, and consensus-building standpoints while underscoring the need for - and difficulties in achieving - critical social impact assessment.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-155G

    ENCOUNTERING THINGS
    This class explores the ways that objects and bodies come into contact with one another, asking how objects adorn, articulate, equip, augment, and constitute the person. Our exploration follows three tracks: we examine artifacts from the fields of design, fashion and medical engineering, as well as experimental propositions from the visual and conceptual arts, literature and film; we pair these case studies with scholarship that critically engages issues of embodiment and material agency; and we attend to the political and ethical debates raised by dynamic conceptions of posthuman bodies. Interdisciplinary readings across the humanities and social sciences include: Appadurai, Freud, Haraway, Hayles, Heidegger, Latour, Marx, Miller, and Scary.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-142G

    ETHICS OF HUMANITARIAN DESIGN
    Designers and artists have become central to projects of "humanitarian help" across the world. Whether they are designing refugee camps, village schools, water filtration systems, or textiles, they are seen to be critical in confronting challenges of poverty. Yet as form-givers, designers and artists not only make physical objects, but also shape our understanding of the problem at hand as well as the profile of the person in need. This power to represent, to define both the subject and the context, demands that designer and artist should not only be technically proficient and aesthetically capable, but also be able to think about the ethics of intervention.
    Whose convenience do we design for? What critical aspects of the situation, be they historical, cultural, linguistic, geopolitical, do we censor with our designs? Do we make others' problems appear in need of our solutions? If we take these questions as a starting point, what sort of knowledge, what sort of sensibility is needed to lean to talk, to see, to translate, across difference, without turning whom we seek to help into convenient caricatures? Can art and design only provide stopgap solutions, leaving larger political and policy discussions for other disciplines? Or can they address questions beyond the object and change our understanding of the problem itself.
    This course asks these hard questions and unpacks them with the help of rigorous theoretical thinking and historical study. This is not a "how-to" course. Nor will we use ready-made definitions of ethics to endorse convenient and familiar ways of working. This is a course about thinking. We slowly shape an understanding of ethics as a way of introducing reflective friction in our modes of operation and learn to criticize what we must simultaneously use. Course material includes mind-opening historical and theoretical texts, uncomfortable fiction, and fraught films.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-163G

    EXPLORATIONS OF CASTING: CERAMICS, GLASS, AND METAL
    There is a common language of casting and mold-making that remains consistent whatever the material one is working with. This graduate studio course begins with an introduction to the materials and techniques of casting and mold-making: plaster, wax and/or rubber. Using the principles of casting and mold-making as a foundation, students begin to explore the more specialized processes of metal casting in the Metcalf Foundry, slip casting in Ceramics, and glass casting in the Glass Hot Shop.
    Graduate Elective - studio
  • GRAD-2312

    FROM IMMATERIAL TO MATERIAL
    This course provides students with the skills needed to fully transform their 2D rendering and drafting skills into effective 3D forms. Through the use of large stationary machines, power tools, and hand tools, individuals will develop the ability to communicate their design skills into highly evolved, tangible forms. Contemporary joinery methods, efficient shaping, and construction schemes will be systematically delineated. Additionally, numerous hardware, fasteners, surface treatments, and finishes will be thoroughly covered throughout this class.
    Graduate elective
    Open to Seniors and above
  • GRAD-078G

    FULL SCALE
    This course focuses on the graduate level inquiry of wood-based construction designs and commensurate skills. Lighting and upholstery techniques as well as outside vendor protocols may be employed depending on the graduate student's design needs. Graduate students develop a multi-lateral skill set applicable to their area of study. Thesis concepts are often explored within this class. Students concentrate, in sequence, six weeks of studio-based learning of numerous techniques and skills followed by six weeks of a dedicated, full-scale, designed and executed piece. Located in the Center for Integrated Technologies (CIT), the Graduate Studies Wood Studio focuses on contemporary and traditional joinery, shaping, and bent lamination construction techniques. Surface treatments and finishing methods for metal and wood also will be covered throughout this class.
    Graduate elective - studio
  • GRAD-161G

    GRADUATE DRAWING
    This course presents the graduate student with a series of problems intended to develop drawing as a tool for inquiry into a terrain outside the well-known beaten paths of his/her past studio practice. One goal is to expand the role for drawing in studio experimentation. There are critiques each week and work is done outside of class.
    Graduate elective - studio
  • GRAD-147G

    GRADUATE TYPOGRAPHY FOR NON-MAJORS
    This introductory course is intended for graduate students interested in learning the basic principles of typography: the study of letterforms, type classification, legibility, organization, and hierarchy - as well as text application, grid systems, and page layout. Typography is explored as both a means of communication and a vehicle for expression. Graduate students from all disciplines with an interest in incorporating typography into their repertory are welcome.
    Graduate elective - studio
  • GRAD-152G

    GROUP CRITIQUE / CRITICAL DIALOGUES
    This course serves as a forum for extended group critiques of the ongoing and self-initiated projects of its participants. While different disciplines have differing formats for critique, its practice in this class is not taken for granted. The course speculates on critique as a form - the crit, critique, and criticality as techniques. We trace our current conceptions of critique back to historic precedents in Critical Theory, the Situationist International, and Institutional Critique, and we examine how those strategies bear out today.
    In general, studio critiques are open-ended, generous, and rigorous analyses among peers. Critiques are a means of examining the conscious and unconscious intentions in your work and understanding how those intentions are read by a viewer. Through group critiques students develop critical skills that help them articulate the conceptual and formal premises of their work. The goals of this course are to foster a cogent and critical understanding of your practice, to aid you in the elaboration and illumination of your ideas and ongoing work, and to provide a site where a culture of critical inquiry and conversation across disciplines can take place.
    The seminar portion of the class includes examinations of practitioners tailored to fit the interests of participating students. In addition we examine readings by Friedrich Nietzsche, Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, Peggy Phalen, Juli Carson, Andrea Fraser, Alexander Alberro, and others.
    Graduate elective - studio
  • GRAD-143G

    INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH FOR ART AND DESIGN
    In art and design, inquiry, discovery, and awareness are essential to contextualizing one's practice, focusing one's creativity, and ethically and meaningfully situating one's work in the world. At the same time, "research" refers to a wide range of disciplinary theories, approaches, and projects. This course aims to foster new levels of research literacy through weekly presentation and discussion of actual research issues faced by working artists, designers, and scholars at RISD. Through shared investigation of research experiences and challenges, students learn more about various methods of inquiry (e.g., practice-based, archival, ethnographic, sociological, scientific, digital, etc.), engage with current issues of research practice, and work toward developing appropriate applications and potential lines of inquiry for their own degree work.
    Graduate Elective - seminar
  • GRAD-165G

    LATE MODERNISM/POST MODERNISM
    With the rise of post-war movements such as the New York School, critical writing in the United States attained a certain urgency. How to define the radical meanings of mid-century art? This class considers the varied responses of Clement Greenberg, Harold Rosenberg, Meyer Schapiro, Leo Steinberg and others, and how their essays and reviews either refined pre-existing formalist strategies or turned to philosophical models such Marxism or existentialism. As their positions became increasingly entrenched in the late modernist period, a certain fallout ensued with the result that academically trained writers such Rosalind Krauss, Douglas Crimp, and Craig Owens eventually questioned once cornerstone beliefs in originality and the artist's subjectivity. Others, such as Michael Fried, Philip Leider, and William Rubin, remained devoted to formalist criteria. In a post-modern era where little or no critical consensus prevailed, a rich, diverse body of discourse emerged that is examined in depth through these and other key critics such as Arthur C. Danto, bell hooks, Cornell West, and Dave Hickey.
    Graduate Elective - seminar
  • GRAD-145G

    MAKING V.1
    v.1 is RISD's new graduate student-run publication (first issue to launch in May 2016). It is written, edited, designed, illustrated, and produced by RISD graduate students in all disciplines, in the context of this full-year course, with additional contributions from the graduate community at large. (The class meets biweekly in Fall and Spring, for a total of 3 credits. It is expected that students will enroll in both semesters.) The course is composed of two overlapping parts: 1.) a seminar investigating experimental contemporary art, design, cultural, and scholarly publications (in print, online, and live) that feature writing by artists and designers (think Design Observer, Dot Dot Dot, Triple Canopy, Cabinet, F.R. David, Mousse, Creative Time Reports, and Journal for Artistic Research, to name a few); and 2.) a studio in which the class becomes the v.1 staff-envisioning and making this annual view into what matters to our graduate community and the world beyond. The course combines guest lectures, seminar-style discussions of readings, workshop-style discussions of student writings, presentations of annotated bibliographies and submissions, hands-on editorial work, peer review, and ongoing feedback from the instructor. Artists and designers are contributing to cultural discourse like never before, and writing today takes many forms-scholarly, journalistic, critical, experimental, electronic, image- or design-driven, or hybrid. Together we develop not just a publication (whose form and content will change year to year, hence always being "volume 1"), but significant relationships between writing, art and design practice, and contributing to public discourse.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-145G

    MAKING V.1
    v.1 is RISD's new graduate student-run publication (first issue to launch in May 2016). It is written, edited, designed, illustrated, and produced by RISD graduate students in all disciplines, in the context of this full-year course, with additional contributions from the graduate community at large. (The class meets biweekly in Fall and Spring, for a total of 3 credits. It is expected that students will enroll in both semesters.) The course is composed of two overlapping parts: 1.) a seminar investigating experimental contemporary art, design, cultural, and scholarly publications (in print, online, and live) that feature writing by artists and designers (think Design Observer, Dot Dot Dot, Triple Canopy, Cabinet, F.R. David, Mousse, Creative Time Reports, and Journal for Artistic Research, to name a few); and 2.) a studio in which the class becomes the v.1 staff-envisioning and making this annual view into what matters to our graduate community and the world beyond. The course combines guest lectures, seminar-style discussions of readings, workshop-style discussions of student writings, presentations of annotated bibliographies and submissions, hands-on editorial work, peer review, and ongoing feedback from the instructor. Artists and designers are contributing to cultural discourse like never before, and writing today takes many forms-scholarly, journalistic, critical, experimental, electronic, image- or design-driven, or hybrid. Together we develop not just a publication (whose form and content will change year to year, hence always being "volume 1"), but significant relationships between writing, art and design practice, and contributing to public discourse.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-031G

    MAPPING THE INTELLIGENCE OF YOUR WORK
    This seminar is for graduate students who are preparing their written thesis. Within the context of this writing-intensive course, we examine the thesis form as an expressive opportunity to negotiate a meaningful integration of our visual work, how we think about it, and how we wish to communicate it to others. In support of this exploration, weekly thematic writing sessions are offered to open the imaginative process and to stimulate creative thinking as a means of discovering the underlying intelligence of our work. In addition, we also engage in individual studio visits to identify and form a coherent 'voice' for the thesis, one that parallels our actual art involvement. Literary communications generated out of artists' and designers' process are also examined. The outcome of this intensive study is the completion of a draft of the thesis.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-031G

    MAPPING THE INTELLIGENCE OF YOUR WORK
    This seminar is for graduate students who are preparing their written thesis. Within the context of this writing-intensive course, we examine the thesis form as an expressive opportunity to negotiate a meaningful integration of our visual work, how we think about it, and how we wish to communicate it to others. In support of this exploration, weekly thematic writing sessions are offered to open the imaginative process and to stimulate creative thinking as a means of discovering the underlying intelligence of our work. In addition, we also engage in individual studio visits to identify and form a coherent 'voice' for the thesis, one that parallels our actual art involvement. Literary communications generated out of artists' and designers' process are also examined. The outcome of this intensive study is the completion of a draft of the thesis.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-166G

    MATERIAL INTO THINGS
    Material into Things: what the world is made of, and what we make of it

    "It is ... a political decision to focus on the materials of art; it means to consider the processes of making and their associated power relations, to consider the workers - whether they are in factories, studios or public spaces ... and their tools of production." - Petra Lange-Berndt, How to be Complicit with Materials.
    This is an interdisciplinary course about materiality. We explore the many materials we use as artists and consumers - how they are formed, extracted, developed, circulated, and used, and how we think about them. We look at the physical world through three lenses: science/production, theory, and art practice. These three approaches run concurrently throughout the semester so that students are simultaneously investigating, reading, and making work. The course has films, guest speakers, readings, participant presentations, course resources, and field trips.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-164G

    MULTI-DISCIPLINARY GRADUATE FINE ARTS SEMINAR
    This course examines a breadth of critical and aesthetic issues relevant to a diverse group of innovative and genre-blending emerging artists about to enter into the continuum of contemporary Fine Arts praxis. Through readings, lectures, and class discussions, students in this weekly seminar explore the ideas and approaches manifest in the contemporary art world. Open to students from all disciplines with a Fine Arts practice, the class engages in discursive conversation, writing, and thinking about contemporary artistic practice in the expanded field - one that traverses disciplines and media. Student-generated writing, research, and studio practice contribute to the cultivation of a shared conceptual grammar that extends the limits of the experimental extremity of our practice. Related readings include canonical art historical texts and contemporary art criticism, fiction, and fact.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • GRAD-112G

    ORIGIN POINT: GRADUATE THESIS IDEATION WORKSHOPS
    The purpose of this seminar is to unearth a direction - an origin point - for your graduate thesis and to jump-start the writing process for the Master's written document. Organized as a series of writing intensive workshops, this forum will enable you to explore relevant ideas, themes, core values, and to conduct research in support of the inquiry process. The process involves seeking out and scrutinizing various angles of your perspective as an artist / designer. You will write from these angles to discover the emerging aspects of solutions that matter. Each class will suggest a specific theme or principle of inflection to precipitate what is needed for the work's progress. Included will be several forms of writing: profile, review, narrative essay, poem, report, extended caption, as well as several levels of research: archival, bibliographic, fieldwork, and interview. Emphasis will also be on maps of meaning that will be used as a way to further processes of ideation and understanding. At the conclusion of the seminar you will have a conceptual focus for your thesis that is clearly formulated visually and verbally. With this is place, the summer months can then be used productively to further the breadth and depth of this initial idea through open-ended exploration and self-generated work.
    Graduate elective - seminar
    Available to first-year graduate students only
  • GRAD-101G

    PUBLIC ART: HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE
    Public Art: History, Theory, and Practice

    This course offers the opportunity to discover the creative and career possibilities in the growing interdisciplinary field of public art and public practice. During the first half of the course, students research and present aspects of each weekly topic, including: pivotal events and artworks that formed the history of public art from the early 20th century to the present; individual artist's work and approaches to site-specificity; current debates around defining the public, public space, and community; temporary vs. permanent work; controversies in public art; memorials, monuments, and anti-monuments; a case study of design team practice in a public/private development; public art administration models, among other topics. During the second half, students work both individually and collaboratively on proposals and projects: a proposal for a memorial; proposals for a specific site in Providence; and temporary artworks sited in Providence.
    This is a collaborative course with Brown University's Program in Public Humanities. In the fall the course is on the Brown campus and on Brown's academic schedule.
    Note: Note: This is a collaborative course with Brown University's Program in Public Humanities. For 2016 Fall the course is on the Brown campus and on Brown's academic schedule. The location is 357 Benefit Street, second floor seminar room. There are 6 openings for RISD graduate students within the 15 total openings.
    Contact Info: janetzweig@me.com
    Graduate elective - studio.
  • GRAD-167G

    SCENIC DESIGN FOR THE STAGE
    How do you transform an existing text and/or piece of music into a world for performance? How do you design a space to tell a story? This studio explores the process of transformation and storytelling to create scenic designs for performance. Students create three projects during this course: a project for a proscenium theater, a thrust stage, and a flexible "black box" space. During this course students investigate the relationship between scenic design and existing theater architecture as well as the relationship between the audience and performance. Emphasis is given to the examination of the text or source material, the formulation of design ideas, and the visual expression of those ideas. Students acquire skills in research, drawing, and model-making for the theatrical design.
    Graduate elective - studio
  • GRAD-159G

    STUDIO LANGUAGES
    This combination studio/seminar course explores the relationship between art and language on multiple scales. We collectively examine - through in-class discussions, lectures, readings, and critique of studio assignments - how our relationships to language make possible an aesthetics of communication, a space where visual and verbal intersections speak of interactions between cultures. Lectures present the work of artists who use text, translation, voice, and language learning as strategies to parlay their socio-linguistic perceptions into agency. Critique of student work produced in response to assignments focuses on an exploration of language within and around each student's art practice. This course is recommended for those who speak more than one language or are interested in multiple Englishes and intercultural communication as material, subject, and foundation for creative excavation.
    Graduate Elective - studio
  • GRAD-144G

    WHAT NEXT?(MAKING A) LIVING AS AN ARTIST
    What Next? (Making a) Living as an Artist

    For this Professional Practices course, we explore the practical possibilities for your life after art school. Emphasis is on balancing your artistic practice with the financial demands of everyday life, on integrating your career path(s) with your artistic values and integrity, on developing realistic goals and strategies, and on finding "branching paths" that open new prospects.
    Various avenues are explored, such as: exhibiting in galleries and museums, starting a business, working on commission, art writing, social practice, and forming a collective, a publication, or an independent gallery. Current financial, practical, and ethical ramifications of each of these avenues are considered. We discuss what matters when deciding where, geographically, to begin your career.
    The course provides a number of skills: creating proposals, presentations, artists' statements, and resumes; and obtaining grants, residencies, commissions, art-related employment, studio space, and representation. Also touched upon are art law, copyright, budgeting, and taxes for artists.
    There are guest speakers from galleries, public art agencies, design businesses, and a trip to New York City. We meet RISD graduate alumni who are currently developing their careers as artists and designers, and hear about their paths from graduation to living as artists.
    Graduate elective - seminar
  • IDISC-2140

    WKSHP:INTRO TO DIGITAL MAKING
    This five-week workshop at the beginning of the fall, Wintersession, and spring semesters (1-credit each)as well as a end of semester project which gives students a well-rounded introduction to the use of digital fabrication tools and an overview of their applications in both art and design. The course also functions as a gateway to Co-Works, RISD's cross-departmental fab lab and experimental workspace; successful completion of the workshop grants access beyond the time frame of the course.
    Co-Works features digital tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, 4-axis CNC mill, plotter cutter, CNC hot wire foam cutter, CNC embroidery machine, UV printer that applies color to 3D surfaces, and related software. Co-Works also includes more "traditional" fabrication technologies such as vacuum formers, large format 2D printing, industrial sewing machines, and sergers. Through technical demos and class projects, students are trained in the proper use of many of these tools as time and interest dictates.
    The course explores the theoretical implications of this technology and situates it within the context of contemporary art and design practices. Through slide presentations, readings, class discussions, and visiting artist lectures, students are encouraged to think critically about the role of digital tools in contemporary art and design and in their own practices. Students develop hybrid approaches incorporating both "traditional" and "new" processes. Class projects encourage experimentation, innovation, and interdisciplinary collaboration as well as provide opportunities for individual exploration. No prior experience with 3D modeling or digital fabrication is required. Participation from all majors and departments is strongly encouraged.
    This course is open to all undergraduate students. Graduate students can register in the crosslisted course GRAD-214G.
  • IDISC-2140

    WKSHP:INTRO TO DIGITAL MAKING
    This five-week workshop at the beginning of the fall, Wintersession, and spring semesters (1-credit each)as well as a end of semester project which gives students a well-rounded introduction to the use of digital fabrication tools and an overview of their applications in both art and design. The course also functions as a gateway to Co-Works, RISD's cross-departmental fab lab and experimental workspace; successful completion of the workshop grants access beyond the time frame of the course.
    Co-Works features digital tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, 4-axis CNC mill, plotter cutter, CNC hot wire foam cutter, CNC embroidery machine, UV printer that applies color to 3D surfaces, and related software. Co-Works also includes more "traditional" fabrication technologies such as vacuum formers, large format 2D printing, industrial sewing machines, and sergers. Through technical demos and class projects, students are trained in the proper use of many of these tools as time and interest dictates.
    The course explores the theoretical implications of this technology and situates it within the context of contemporary art and design practices. Through slide presentations, readings, class discussions, and visiting artist lectures, students are encouraged to think critically about the role of digital tools in contemporary art and design and in their own practices. Students develop hybrid approaches incorporating both "traditional" and "new" processes. Class projects encourage experimentation, innovation, and interdisciplinary collaboration as well as provide opportunities for individual exploration. No prior experience with 3D modeling or digital fabrication is required. Participation from all majors and departments is strongly encouraged.
    This course is open to all undergraduate students. Graduate students can register in the crosslisted course GRAD-214G.
  • IDISC-2140

    WKSHP:INTRO TO DIGITAL MAKING
    This five-week workshop at the beginning of the fall, Wintersession, and spring semesters (1-credit each)as well as a end of semester project which gives students a well-rounded introduction to the use of digital fabrication tools and an overview of their applications in both art and design. The course also functions as a gateway to Co-Works, RISD's cross-departmental fab lab and experimental workspace; successful completion of the workshop grants access beyond the time frame of the course.
    Co-Works features digital tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, 4-axis CNC mill, plotter cutter, CNC hot wire foam cutter, CNC embroidery machine, UV printer that applies color to 3D surfaces, and related software. Co-Works also includes more "traditional" fabrication technologies such as vacuum formers, large format 2D printing, industrial sewing machines, and sergers. Through technical demos and class projects, students are trained in the proper use of many of these tools as time and interest dictates.
    The course explores the theoretical implications of this technology and situates it within the context of contemporary art and design practices. Through slide presentations, readings, class discussions, and visiting artist lectures, students are encouraged to think critically about the role of digital tools in contemporary art and design and in their own practices. Students develop hybrid approaches incorporating both "traditional" and "new" processes. Class projects encourage experimentation, innovation, and interdisciplinary collaboration as well as provide opportunities for individual exploration. No prior experience with 3D modeling or digital fabrication is required. Participation from all majors and departments is strongly encouraged.
    This course is open to all undergraduate students. Graduate students can register in the crosslisted course GRAD-214G.
  • GRAD-214G

    WKSHP:INTRO TO DIGITAL MAKING@COWORKS
    This five-week workshop at the beginning of the fall, Wintersession, and spring semesters (1-credit each) as well as an end of semester project which gives students a well-rounded introduction to the use of digital fabrication tools and an overview of their applications in both art and design. The course also functions as a gateway to Co-Works, RISD's cross-departmental fab lab and experimental workspace; successful completion of the workshop grants access beyond the time frame of the course.
    Co-Works features digital tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, 4-axis CNC mill, plotter cutter, CNC hot wire foam cutter, CNC embroidery machine, UV printer that applies color to 3D surfaces, and related software. Co-Works also includes more "traditional" fabrication technologies such as vacuum formers, large format 2D printing, industrial sewing machines, and sergers. Through technical demos and class projects, students are trained in the proper use of many of these tools as time and interest dictates.
    The course explores the theoretical implications of this technology and situates it within the context of contemporary art and design practices. Through slide presentations, readings, class discussions, and visiting artist lectures, students are encouraged to think critically about the role of digital tools in contemporary art and design and in their own practices. Students develop hybrid approaches incorporating both "traditional" and "new" processes. Class projects encourage experimentation, innovation, and interdisciplinary collaboration as well as provide opportunities for individual exploration. No prior experience with 3D modeling or digital fabrication is required. Participation from all majors and departments is strongly encouraged.
    This course is open to all graduate students. Undergraduates can register in the crosslisted course IDISC-2140.
  • GRAD-214G

    WKSHP:INTRO TO DIGITAL MAKING@COWORKS
    This five-week workshop at the beginning of the fall, Wintersession, and spring semesters (1-credit each) as well as an end of semester project which gives students a well-rounded introduction to the use of digital fabrication tools and an overview of their applications in both art and design. The course also functions as a gateway to Co-Works, RISD's cross-departmental fab lab and experimental workspace; successful completion of the workshop grants access beyond the time frame of the course.
    Co-Works features digital tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, 4-axis CNC mill, plotter cutter, CNC hot wire foam cutter, CNC embroidery machine, UV printer that applies color to 3D surfaces, and related software. Co-Works also includes more "traditional" fabrication technologies such as vacuum formers, large format 2D printing, industrial sewing machines, and sergers. Through technical demos and class projects, students are trained in the proper use of many of these tools as time and interest dictates.
    The course explores the theoretical implications of this technology and situates it within the context of contemporary art and design practices. Through slide presentations, readings, class discussions, and visiting artist lectures, students are encouraged to think critically about the role of digital tools in contemporary art and design and in their own practices. Students develop hybrid approaches incorporating both "traditional" and "new" processes. Class projects encourage experimentation, innovation, and interdisciplinary collaboration as well as provide opportunities for individual exploration. No prior experience with 3D modeling or digital fabrication is required. Participation from all majors and departments is strongly encouraged.
    This course is open to all graduate students. Undergraduates can register in the crosslisted course IDISC-2140.
  • GRAD-214G

    WKSHP:INTRO TO DIGITAL MAKING@COWORKS
    This five-week workshop at the beginning of the fall, Wintersession, and spring semesters (1-credit each) as well as an end of semester project which gives students a well-rounded introduction to the use of digital fabrication tools and an overview of their applications in both art and design. The course also functions as a gateway to Co-Works, RISD's cross-departmental fab lab and experimental workspace; successful completion of the workshop grants access beyond the time frame of the course.
    Co-Works features digital tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, 4-axis CNC mill, plotter cutter, CNC hot wire foam cutter, CNC embroidery machine, UV printer that applies color to 3D surfaces, and related software. Co-Works also includes more "traditional" fabrication technologies such as vacuum formers, large format 2D printing, industrial sewing machines, and sergers. Through technical demos and class projects, students are trained in the proper use of many of these tools as time and interest dictates.
    The course explores the theoretical implications of this technology and situates it within the context of contemporary art and design practices. Through slide presentations, readings, class discussions, and visiting artist lectures, students are encouraged to think critically about the role of digital tools in contemporary art and design and in their own practices. Students develop hybrid approaches incorporating both "traditional" and "new" processes. Class projects encourage experimentation, innovation, and interdisciplinary collaboration as well as provide opportunities for individual exploration. No prior experience with 3D modeling or digital fabrication is required. Participation from all majors and departments is strongly encouraged.
    This course is open to all graduate students. Undergraduates can register in the crosslisted course IDISC-2140.
Grad Studies Foreground Image 5
A gallery visitor checks out one of the many interactive installations often found at the grad shows.