Graduate Studies Electives

Overview

The division of Graduate Studies offers studios and seminars designed to provide students with opportunities for interdisciplinary study and the exploration of issues and practices of interest to advanced-level students in all disciplines. The courses provide opportunities to:

  • explore areas of interest beyond program requirements
  • collaborate on projects with students from diverse backgrounds
  • connect with the larger graduate student population
  • ground your own studio explorations in the context of contemporary theory and practice

Not all of the following courses are offered every year, but this list gives a sense of the kinds of questions and conversations supported by the Graduate Studies curriculum. All GS electives are open to any graduate student, without prerequisites.

Courses

  • GRAD-059G

    ART & DESIGN: INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION IN THEORY AND PRACTICE
    Many critics have argued that artists and designers have been used as exemplary models of a newly formed "nomadic," "creative," "interactive," or "casual" workforce. At the same time, collaboration has become valorized by many cultural and educational institutions. Given this scenario, we will ask whether collaboration has arrived at some neutral post-ideological state. Has collaboration ossified into a genre? Is collaboration a new name for the 90s corporate buzzword synergy, the symptom of some administrative impulse? Or does it express an emancipatory desire for something other than existing artistic and political structures? This course creates a forum to question whether the greater visibility of collaboration in art and design in recent years can have any critical purchase on perennial questions of authorship, agency, ownership, and value. We experiment with techniques to reinvest some kind of radical possibility (aesthetic, political, social) into the concept of collaboration as we develop our own ideas through discussion and practical application.
    We chart the relations between cultural producers and society at large, and consider collaboration as that which names varied and often conflicting practices. And we explore what these practices have to say about how art and society is produced, reproduced, and potentially re-imagined. The contested meaning of the term collaboration and how those practices are valued in their ideological, economic, ethical, and political dimensions will be our focus.
    This course involves critical and historical readings on relationality, performativity, labor theory, and political theory. Through case studies in collaborative art/design practices, we broach topics such as site specificity, public art, and artist collectives. Two visits to New York to meet with practitioners and visit exhibitions are scheduled, in addition to visits with artists and designers around Providence, and three short collaborative projects.
    Graduate elective
  • GRAD-091G

    ART AND DESIGN DEVELOPMENT
    The Art and Design for Development graduate seminar is for students interested in exploring the role art and design can play in addressing social justice issues in vulnerable, under-resourced and often still-developing regions of the world. The seminar positions the artist/designer as an innovator and activist and explores methodologies and rationale for applying strategic design thinking, processes, and outcomes to issues as complex and diverse as persistent poverty; displaced communities, human and environmental devastation due to war; human trafficking and enslavement; resource deprivation, lack of educational opportunity; livelihood needs, etc. Strategic planning and action, systems thinking, participatory methods, resilience theory, and capacity building provide the theoretical underpinnings for the course and are discussed within a critical framework of the history of international development and ethics of engagement. Critical to this effort will be the students' development of rigorous research skills and clear methodological approaches, and their ability to map and critique their own progress through a strategic design thinking process. The seminar is project based, and situates this effort within an overview and critique of the methodologies and scales of engagement represented by contemporary social impact focused design practice. Projects are undertaken by interdisciplinary teams and focus on the design of strategic action plans for communities and/or organizations currently partnering with RISD's DESINE-Lab-an interdisciplinary applied research group focused on employing design, innovation, and entrepreneurship to address social and environmental justice issues and drive community-based social and economic development. As key players in these on-going relationships, class participants have opportunities to stay involved with DESINE-Lab activities, help implement the steps of the various plans through interning with partnering organizations, lead workshops in the field, and collaborate with future design-build efforts.
    Graduate elective
  • GRAD-026G

    ART AND DESIGN PRACTICUM: WORK, MONEY, LOVE
    The meeting with (Alighiero) Boetti changed my life in a day. One of the first things he advised me to do when in conversation with artists (and designers) was always to ask them about their unrealized projects. I have done it ever since.
    Hans Ulrich Obrist, Curator
    Perhaps if the next generation of artists emerges more committed to the public sphere, more able to articulate the complexity of their intent, less intimidated by social ambivalences, they will feel more confident to insist that their essential importance to society be more greatly acknowledged. If they enter society clear about their role and purpose, perhaps society will take them more seriously and come to understand that in denying artists their rightful place in public consciousness, we are in fact negating the most creative part of ourselves individually and collectively and in so doing as also damning our future to one without experimentation and the vision needed to give it meaning.
    Carol Becker, Scholar, writer
    Funded by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation (Marketplace Empowerment Program) and open to all graduate students in all disciplines, this "professional practices" and contemporary identities of creativity course explores models, philosophies, strategies, agilities, adaptive skills, conditions and resources crucial to developing and communicating self-aware, diverse, sustainable, relevant, and evolving practices in art and design. The course utilizes and entangles several themes and metaphors - work, money, love - that characterize and form the many possible shapes of a life-long creative life and practice. Work explores labor, manufacturing/fabrication, studio space and work environments, independent, collaborative, and diversified practice. Money tackles legal and financial literacy, markets, grants, and fundraising. Love invites students into writing, thinking, and making as discovery, collaboration, ethics, engagement, commitment, and persistence. Other topics include "dangerous self-sufficiency," self-repair, attractions, exclusions, and multiple and mutable identities of artists, designers, and creative workers.
    We will act as a research group on professional issues in art and design. The goal is to experiment in democratic, flexible forms of pedagogy in which we support one another in thinking critically and expansively about the work we want to do, the ideas we want to cultivate, and the lives we choose to live. In other words, we all will contribute and create content. In addition to the instructor and students/participants in the course, visiting artists, designers, scholars, and other practitioners provide presentations, workshops, activities, and assignments over sustained meetings to broaden and deepen levels of inquiry, dialogue, and exchange-based experience.
    Graduate elective
  • GRAD-210G

    ARTISTS' RESEARCH: THEORY AND PRACTICE
    This course will introduce art and design graduate students to empirical, primarily qualitative, and arts-based research methodologies prevalent in contemporary arts and arts education research practice. Students will be introduced to the concept of research methodology and the various ontological and epistemological paradigms that inform diverse methodologies. During this methodological exploration, students will learn about the research process from identifying a research topic through a reflection on personal interests and experiences and a critical review of literature, to situating the research problem within a body of literature and conceptual framework, with the concomitant objective of refining students' research literacy skills. Students may develop a research design for their thesis or a practice based study of teaching as a course project.
    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00
    Graduate Elective
  • GRAD-032G

    CRITICAL ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ART
    This seminar draws on a number of critical texts from the past three decades by writers such as Rosalind Krauss, Douglas Crimp, bell hooks, Dave Hickey, and Arthur C. Danto while probing their linkages to key debates in contemporary culture. By considering issues that relate to the viability of the expression of the artist025s subjectivity in the post-modern era as well topics pertaining to race, gender, sexuality, the marketplace, mass media and popular culture, a broad view of the subjects, themes and discourses of contemporary art emerges. The course is structured around in-class discussion of assigned articles, slide lectures, and presentations. The seminar aims to extend the range of critical texts currently read by each student especially as they develop their graduate thesis. Each student is responsible for one 30-minute class presentation with a follow-up paper of 10-12 pages due the last day of class, or before. Participation in class discussion is a requirement of the course, constituting a part of the final grade.
    Graduate elective
  • GRAD-658G

    DRAWING OBJECTIVES: A GUIDED DRAWING SEMINAR
    Drawing has been called the distillation of an idea. Drawing sensibilities pervade all visual media yet drawing can be independent of all other media. Can we make our drawing ventures have resonance? The goal is to understand drawing in a multivalent way through paced experiences and investigations via short research projects, three generative series and development of a sited-drawing plan. Methods will include teamed technical presentations of expertise or interest as well as examples of ancient and historical means of silverpoint, transfer drawings, panoramas and dioramas. Drawing epochs represented in the RISD Museum of Art, collection will be examined (through works by artists such as Wilfredo Lam, Gego, or the Rimpa period Korin Gafu.) Focused critiques, readings and guided and self-directed independent studio production are components. This seminar could be paired with the grad course Object Lessons.
    Graduate elective
    Also offered as a requirement for MA, ARTE 658G. Register into the course for which credit is desired.
  • GRAD-155G

    ENCOUNTERING THINGS: SUBJECTS, OBJECTS, AND THE PROSTHETIC IMAGINATION
    This class explores the ways that objects and bodies come into contact with one another, asking how objects adorn, articulate, equip, augment, and constitute the person. Our exploration follows three tracks: we examine artifacts from the fields of design, fashion and medical engineering, as well as experimental propositions from the visual and conceptual arts, literature and film; we pair these case studies with scholarship that critically engages issues of embodiment and material agency; and we attend to the political and ethical debates raised by dynamic conceptions of posthuman bodies. Interdisciplinary readings across the humanities and social sciences include: Appadurai, Freud, Haraway, Hayles, Heidegger, Latour, Marx, Miller, and Scary.
    Graduate elective
  • GRAD-142G

    ETHICS OF HUMANITARIAN DESIGN
    Designers and artists have become central to projects of humanitarian intervention in different parts of the world. From designing refugee camps and village schools to water filtration systems and weaving patterns that could compete in Western markets, they are not only making physical objects for disenfranchised across the world, but also shaping how we understand the problems at hand as well as the people in need. This extended role demands a new ethical sensibility and historical knowledge in addition to technical know-how and aesthetic capability. What does it mean to act ethically in a global context? What is the nature of responsibility? How do we communicate across difference without turning whom we seek to help into convenient caricatures of helpless poor? Can art and design only provide stopgap solutions, leaving larger political and policy discussions for other disciplines? Or can they address questions beyond the object and change our understanding of the problem itself?
    This course will ask these hard questions and unpack them with the help of rigorous theoretical thinking and historical study. This is not a "how-to" course. Nor will we use ready-made definitions of ethics to endorse convenient and familiar ways of working. This is a course about thinking. We will slowly shape an understanding of ethics as a way of introducing reflective friction in our modes of operation and learn to criticize what we must simultaneously use. Course material will include mind-opening historical and theoretical texts, uncomfortable fiction, and fraught films. Only serious thinkers hopelessly invested in their making, and vice versa, invited.
    Graduate elective
  • GRAD-2312

    FROM IMMATERIAL TO MATERIAL
    This course provides students with the skills needed to fully transform their 2D rendering and drafting skills into effective 3D forms. Through the use of large stationary machines, power tools, and hand tools, individuals will develop the ability to communicate their design skills into highly evolved, tangible forms. Contemporary joinery methods, efficient shaping, and construction schemes will be systematically delineated. Additionally, numerous hardware, fasteners, surface treatments, and finishes will be thoroughly covered throughout this class.
    Graduate elective
    Open to Seniors and above
  • GRAD-078G

    FULL SCALE
    This course focuses on the graduate level inquiry of wood-based construction designs and commensurate skills. Lighting and upholstery techniques as well as outside vendor protocols may be employed depending on the graduate student's design needs. Graduate students develop a multi-lateral skill set applicable to their area of study. Thesis concepts are often explored within this class. Students concentrate, in sequence, six weeks of studio-based learning of numerous techniques and skills followed by six weeks of a dedicated, full-scale, designed and executed piece. Located in the Center for Integrated Technologies (CIT), the Graduate Studies Wood Studio focuses on contemporary and traditional joinery, shaping, and bent lamination construction techniques. Surface treatments and finishing methods for metal and wood also will be covered throughout this class.
  • GRAD-152G

    GROUP CRITIQUE / CRITICAL DIALOGUES
    This course serves as a forum for extended group critiques of the ongoing and self-initiated projects of its participants. While different disciplines have differing formats for critique, its practice in this class is not taken for granted. The course speculates on critique as a form-the crit, critique, and criticality as techniques. We trace our current conceptions of critique back to their historic precedents in Weimar in the 30s, Paris in the 60s, New York in the 80s, and examine how those strategies bear out today.
    In general, critiques are open-ended, generous, and rigorous analysis exchanged between peers, a means of examining both the conscious and unconscious drives in your work. Through group critiques students develop critical skills that help them articulate the conceptual and formal premises of their work. The goal of this course, regardless of discipline, is to foster a cogent and critical understanding of your practice that aida you in the elaboration and illumination of your ideas and push the development of your ongoing work.
    The seminar portion of the class includes examinations of practitioners tailored to fit the interests of participating students. In addition we examine readings on critical theory, psychoanalysis, and institutional critique: Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Bertolt Brecht, Jacques Lacan, Felix Guattari, Jacques Rancière, Andrea Fraser, Gregg Bordowitz, Alexander Alberro, and others.
  • GRAD-031G

    MAPPING THE INTELLIGENCE OF YOUR WORK
    This seminar is for graduate students who are preparing their written thesis. Within the context of this writing-intensive course, we examine the thesis form as an expressive opportunity to negotiate a meaningful integration of our visual work, how we think about it, and how we wish to communicate it to others. In support of this exploration, weekly thematic writing sessions are offered to open the imaginative process and to stimulate creative thinking as a means of discovering the underlying intelligence of our work. In addition, we also engage in individual studio visits to identify and form a coherent 'voice' for the thesis, one that parallels our actual art involvement. Literary communications generated out of artists' process are also examined. The outcome of this intensive study is the completion of a draft of the thesis.
    Graduate elective; Graduate level only
  • GRAD-031G

    MAPPING THE INTELLIGENCE OF YOUR WORK
    This seminar is for graduate students who are preparing their written thesis. Within the context of this writing-intensive course, we examine the thesis form as an expressive opportunity to negotiate a meaningful integration of our visual work, how we think about it, and how we wish to communicate it to others. In support of this exploration, weekly thematic writing sessions are offered to open the imaginative process and to stimulate creative thinking as a means of discovering the underlying intelligence of our work. In addition, we also engage in individual studio visits to identify and form a coherent 'voice' for the thesis, one that parallels our actual art involvement. Literary communications generated out of artists' process are also examined. The outcome of this intensive study is the completion of a draft of the thesis.
    Graduate elective; Graduate level only
  • GRAD-211G

    NANO-MESO-MICRO-MACRO
    Nanotechnology involves an astonishingly diverse array of disciplines that combine science and engineering; however, despite its broad scope, nanotech essentially offers all of us the same thing: unprecedented control over matter, and the world that it composes. As such, it excites speculation on the creation of new objects and environments that offer experiences not possible before. By learning about recent advancements in smart materials, biomaterials, and other technologies that are structured at the nano-scale and micro-scale, we'll explore the creation of some fresh, promising applications at the macro-scale, and make prototypes that lend vision to their novelty and merit.
    Please note that you do not need any advanced knowledge of science, technology, and engineering to enroll in this course. The only prerequisites are the wonder and curiosity that stir the creative imagination, and some making skills.
    Graduate elective
  • GRAD-112G

    ORIGIN POINT: GRADUATE THESIS IDEATION WORKSHOP
    The purpose of this seminar is to unearth a direction - an origin point - for your graduate thesis and to jump-start the writing process for the Master's written document. Organized as a series of writing intensive workshops, this forum will enable you to explore relevant ideas, themes, core values, and to conduct research in support of the inquiry process. The process involves seeking out and scrutinizing various angles of your perspective as an artist / designer. You will write from these angles to discover the emerging aspects of solutions that matter. Each class will suggest a specific theme or principle of inflection to precipitate what is needed for the work's progress. Included will be several forms of writing: profile, review, narrative essay, poem, report, extended caption, as well as several levels of research: journal and book reading, archival and fieldwork, and conversations and interviews. Emphasis will also be on maps of meaning that will be used as a way to further processes of ideation and understanding. At the conclusion of the seminar you will have a conceptual focus for your thesis that is clearly formulated visually and verbally. With this is place, the summer months can then be used productively to further the breadth and depth of this initial idea through open-ended exploration and self-generated work.
    Graduate elective; Available to first-year graduate students
  • GRAD-101G

    PUBLIC ART: HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE
    Public Art: History, Theory, and Practice

    The course offers the opportunity to discover the creative and career possibilities in the growing interdisciplinary field of public art and public practice. It is both a seminar and a studio.
    During the first half of the course, students research and present aspects of each weekly topic, including: pivotal events and artworks that formed the history of public art from the early 20th century to the present; individual artists' work and their approaches to site-specificity; current debates around defining the public, public space, and community; temporary vs. permanent work; controversies in public art; memorials, monuments, and anti-monuments; a case study of design team practice in a public/private development; public art administration models, among other topics.
    During the second half, students work collaboratively and individually on proposals and projects: a proposal for a memorial; proposals for a specific site in Providence; and temporary artworks sited in Providence.
    A large on-line database of readings, websites, and other resources are provided. There are readings, videos, and discussions, as well as class time for research, project development, and group meetings.
    Note: This is a collaborative course with Brown University's Program in Public Humanities. In the fall the course is on the Brown campus and on Brown's academic schedule; in the spring, it is on the RISD campus and schedule. Contact Info: janetzweig@me.com
    Graduate elective.
  • GRAD-101G

    PUBLIC ART: HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE
    Public Art: History, Theory, and Practice

    The course offers the opportunity to discover the creative and career possibilities in the growing interdisciplinary field of public art and public practice. It is both a seminar and a studio.
    During the first half of the course, students research and present aspects of each weekly topic, including: pivotal events and artworks that formed the history of public art from the early 20th century to the present; individual artists' work and their approaches to site-specificity; current debates around defining the public, public space, and community; temporary vs. permanent work; controversies in public art; memorials, monuments, and anti-monuments; a case study of design team practice in a public/private development; public art administration models, among other topics.
    During the second half, students work collaboratively and individually on proposals and projects: a proposal for a memorial; proposals for a specific site in Providence; and temporary artworks sited in Providence.
    A large on-line database of readings, websites, and other resources are provided. There are readings, videos, and discussions, as well as class time for research, project development, and group meetings.
    Note: This is a collaborative course with Brown University's Program in Public Humanities. In the fall the course is on the Brown campus and on Brown's academic schedule; in the spring, it is on the RISD campus and schedule. Contact Info: janetzweig@me.com
    Graduate elective.
  • GRAD-212G

    PUBLIC(ATION)S
    In the past decade or so, dozens of new forums featuring writing by artists and designers have emerged (think Design Observer, Dot Dot Dot, Triple Canopy, Cabinet, F.R. David, Mousse, Creative Time Reports, and Journal for Artistic Research, to name a few), and whether by cause or effect, artists and designers are contributing to cultural discourse like never before. This year-long course invites grads from all disciplines to explore and practice writing, editing, and producing for publics and publications. The course takes place over the entire year, meeting biweekly in Fall and Spring and once in Wintersession, and comprises two concurrent parts:
    1) A literature review of some of the above publications (and others, collectively determined), including visits with some of their editors and writers, culminating in individual annotated bibliographies and an article submission;
    2) The class will become the staff of the newly revived "RISD Grad Book"-envisioning, commissioning, editing, writing for, and (pending graphic design expertise among the class) designing this annual view into RISD's graduate education, in both print and online forms.
    Throughout, we will write, with a focus on developing an audience, a purpose, a voice, and a relationship between art and design practice and writing, as well as an ability to navigate page and screen and the text-image-sound affordances of digital media. All forms of writing-scholarly, journalistic, critical, experimental, electronic, image- or design-driven, or hybrid-are welcome. The course combines guest lectures, seminar-style discussions of readings, workshop-style discussions of student writings, presentations of annotated bibliographies and submissions, hands-on editorial work, peer review, and intensive one-on-one feedback from the instructors. Upon completing the course, students will demonstrate knowledge of available publications and platforms, awareness of who their audiences/publics are, and wide-ranging skills applicable to a variety of writing contexts.
    Note: course meets bi-weekly (every other Friday) in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 on FRIDAYS, 1:10-4:10pm and on one full day in Wintersession 2016. Fall schedule: September 18; October 2, 16, 30; November 13, and December 4, 2015.
  • GRAD-212G

    PUBLIC(ATION)S
    In the past decade or so, dozens of new forums featuring writing by artists and designers have emerged (think Design Observer, Dot Dot Dot, Triple Canopy, Cabinet, F.R. David, Mousse, Creative Time Reports, and Journal for Artistic Research, to name a few), and whether by cause or effect, artists and designers are contributing to cultural discourse like never before. This year-long course invites grads from all disciplines to explore and practice writing, editing, and producing for publics and publications. The course takes place over the entire year, meeting biweekly in Fall and Spring and once in Wintersession, and comprises two concurrent parts:
    1) A literature review of some of the above publications (and others, collectively determined), including visits with some of their editors and writers, culminating in individual annotated bibliographies and an article submission;
    2) The class will become the staff of the newly revived "RISD Grad Book"-envisioning, commissioning, editing, writing for, and (pending graphic design expertise among the class) designing this annual view into RISD's graduate education, in both print and online forms.
    Throughout, we will write, with a focus on developing an audience, a purpose, a voice, and a relationship between art and design practice and writing, as well as an ability to navigate page and screen and the text-image-sound affordances of digital media. All forms of writing-scholarly, journalistic, critical, experimental, electronic, image- or design-driven, or hybrid-are welcome. The course combines guest lectures, seminar-style discussions of readings, workshop-style discussions of student writings, presentations of annotated bibliographies and submissions, hands-on editorial work, peer review, and intensive one-on-one feedback from the instructors. Upon completing the course, students will demonstrate knowledge of available publications and platforms, awareness of who their audiences/publics are, and wide-ranging skills applicable to a variety of writing contexts.
    Note: course meets bi-weekly (every other Friday) in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 on FRIDAYS, 1:10-4:10pm and on one full day in Wintersession 2016. Fall schedule: September 18; October 2, 16, 30; November 13, and December 4, 2015.
  • GRAD-159G

    STUDIO LANGUAGES
    In Imaginary Homelands, the Indian British author Salman Rushdie writes, "The word 'translation' comes, etymologically, from the Latin for 'bearing across.' Having been borne across the world, we are translated [people]. It is normally supposed that something always gets lost in translation; I cling obstinately to the notion that something can also be gained."
    What does our work in art and design gain from acts of translation? How does a creative practice rooted in multilingual experience navigate linguistic and cultural hybridity? How does material and conceptual contact between languages shape one's work or provide a foundation for asking large questions?
    This combination studio/seminar course explores the relationship between art and language on multiple scales. We will collectively examine, through in-class discussions, lectures, readings and critique of studio assignments, how our relationships to language make possible an aesthetics of communication, a space where visual and verbal intersections speak of interactions between cultures. Lectures will present the work of artists who use text, translation, voice, and language learning as strategies to parlay their sociolinguistic perceptions into agency. Critique of student work produced in response to assignments will focus on an exploration of language within and around each student's art practice. This course is recommended for those who speak more than one language or are interested in multiple Englishes and intercultural communication as material, subject and foundation for creative excavation.
    Graduate Elective
  • GRAD-015G

    THE ARTIST AND THE MUSEUM
    This seminar will consider the various ways in which manifold artists from Marcel Duchamp through Joseph Cornell, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, Louise Lawler, Fred Wilson, Mark Dion and the Atlas Group have made aspects of the museum a subject matter of their work. Alternatively engaged in a critique of museum practice or romantic evocations of the past, many artists for the past seventy years have addressed the staging devices that museums utilize to confer aura on the work of art as well as the makeup of their collections, categorization and behind the scenes storerooms and archives. This history will be linked to an expanding body of writing that has emerged in the past three decades given to the differing discursive narratives that museums and their archives employ. Writers such as Sigmund Freud, Theodor W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Rosalind Krauss, Douglas Crimp, Ralph Rugoff, and Susan Stewart. will be considered.
    Graduate Elective
  • GRAD-153G

    TIME / TECHNICS / MEDIA
    "I know very well what time is," writes Augustine in the Confessions, "until the moment you ask me, and then I do not know." This philosophical candor was much admired by Ludwig Wittgenstein, who advised that what we cannot speak of we must therefore remain silent. Time, in itself imperceptible, is rendered salient through a variety of intercessionary technologies, utilizing sand, shadow, water, or more complex kinetic devices, to make visible, or audible, its 'passage.' Time can be measured through the body in any number of ways: the physical aging of our bodies, our kinetic movements, the performance of our everyday actions, and our changing outward personal style or disposition. Aesthetic forms, scientific and literary productions 'unfold' in time, moving toward an inexorable conclusion, end, closure or renewal. Phenomena persist, endure, and dissipate. In our contemporaneity time-based media are ubiquitous, and the intimacy between, for example, a naturally produced utterance and its technical reproducibility has become coextensive.
    In this seminar we will begin with an inquiry into the nature of time, beginning with the pre-Socratics, carrying through to Kant, Heidegger, Agamben and Stiegler; at the same time we will also examine the notion of 'technical-being' or techné, contrasted with biological, living being, bios, zöon. But the primary orientation of this seminar will address the medial or technical and aesthetic register of time-based processes and devices. From the camera obscura to telephony, from the incunabula of the proto-cinema to current digital globalizations, we will explore both the materialities and the theories of time, technics and media, and the complexities they entail.
    Graduate elective
Grad Studies Foreground Image 3
The Graduate Thesis Exhibition attracts large crowds during its two-week run at the RI Convention Center.