Courses

Curriculum

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2013-14 
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Courses

Fall Semester 2013
  • ARCH-2048

    A MATERIAL IMAGINATION OF THE SOCIAL CONTRACT

    Credits: 3.00

    The lecture series "A Material Imagination of The Social Contract" is grounded in the idea that the poetic and material imagination, inherent to the arts, affords us unique means of engaging the world and making a contribution. Working from the principle that our capacity to act in the world is grounded in our capacity to recognize and comprehend transformation, the course covers a large arc of content, asking questions of our world, our disciplines and our humanity. The discussion begins with a series of talks called 'the time promises of capital.' These focus on the mechanisms and instruments of capital exchange including: debt, equity and compound interest, as well as incorporation and insurance. These concepts are approached with careful attention to both the ontological impact of these instruments on our perception of time and space as well as the broader social issues of the capital markets as modes of resource distribution. Following the 'time promises' is a series of discussions on words. Here we explore the many links between language, individual agency and collective judgment. Following the discussion on words we move to a series of talks focused on space. These look at the many forms of exchange occurring between our spaces and us with a focus on the capacity of our interior thoughts to construct literate spaces, spaces of participation inseparable from our memory and imagination. The final series of lectures builds from all of the previous questions and content as we look at the many links between: the time promises, words, space, empathy, ethics, the creative disciplines and their social contracts. With examples from 20th century: art, architecture, poetry, film and theater, we move through a close examination of disciplinary structures. Ultimately, the lecture series explores the precisions of the poetic/material imagination as the most pragmatic means of addressing our social and political lives; it offers inverse perspectives from which to imagine; new modes of concern for the other, new promises for distributing risk and resources, new words for rebinding freedom, new spaces of empathy and ethics.
    Open to Junior and Above
  • ARCH-21ST

    ADVANCED STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    These studios, three of which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery on the first day of classes. Once assigned to an advanced studio, a student may not drop studio.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department, course not available via web registration
    Fee: Some advanced studio sections have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the registration lottery held in the Department.
  • ARCH-C729

    ARCHAEOLOGY OF JERUSALEM

    Credits: 3.00

    Jerusalem has earned a special eminence among the famed ancient cities of the world. Its sanctity to Jews, Christians, and Moslems has made the city a focus of discussions and controversies regarding the evolving and changing identifies throughout its long urban history. Early and recent studies and discoveries, as well as old and new theories with a special emphasis on the Roman, Byzantine, and Early Islamic periods (ca. 63 BCE - 1099 CE) will be examined in the seminar. A particular focus will be placed on how to identify ethnicity, religious identity, and gender in the archaeological record. Though politics and religion have often biased related scholarship and the way excavations and their interpretations have been presented to the public, the goal of the seminar is to understand and examine various opinions and viewpoints. This seminar will consist of regular meetings, with illustrated lectures, student presentations, and discussions. In addition to the presentations, weekly reading assignments, a mid-term exam, and a final term paper will be required.
    Students interested in this course must register for ARTH-C729 or HPSS-C729
    Course satisfies Art History or Architecture elective credit.
    .
  • ARCH-2141

    ARCHITECTURAL PROJECTION

    Credits: 3.00

    This course introduces the beginning student to the origins, media, geometries and role(s) of projection drawing in the design and construction process. The student will learn systems of projection drawing from direct experience, and be challenged to work both from life and to life. Subjects such as transparency, figure/ground, sciagraphy, oblique projection, surface development, volumetric intersections, spatial manipulation and analytic operations will build on the basics of orthographic and conic projection. The course involves line and tone drawing, hand drafting, computer drawing(Autocad) and computer modeling(Rhino).
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department, course not available via web registration
  • ARCH-2182

    DP SEM: DRAWINGS OF THINGS

    Credits: 3.00

    "There is no way to make a drawing--there is only drawing." --Richard Serra
    Much of the pleasure of drawing is in the act-the process of its unfolding. The Drawings of Things provides an opportunity to experiment with a variety of simple procedures that can lead to the creation of powerful works. The semester revolves around the making of drawings in various materials and processes guided by the organizational principles of the grid and notions of repetition. The exploration of constructed images undertakes the following topics: surface, materials, mark-making, composition, space and scale. These parameters provide guidance to an otherwise open set of personal investigations made by hand. This tactile connection with the work brings back the human touch, the eye and hand working together, control, concentration, and the language of marking marks.
    Much of the pleasure of drawing is in the act-the process of its unfolding. The Drawing of Things provides an opportunity to experiment with a variety of simple procedures that can lead to the creation of powerful works. The semester revolves around the making of drawings in various materials and processes guided by the organizational principles of the grid and notions of repetition. The exploration of constructed images undertakes the following topics: surface, materials, mark-making,composition, space and scale. These parameters provide guidance to an otherwise open set of personal investigations made by hand. This tactile connection with the work brings back the human touch, the eye and hand working together, control, concentration, and the language of marking marks.
    The "lab" component for the course takes two forms: in addition to the weekly projects to be completed outside seminar hours, participants will be exploring drawing ideas through short, hands-on probes during the 3-hour class. There is no better way to learn than by doing, so with this in mind, advice and direction will be kept to a minimum. Students have their own sensibilities to guide themselves, and its up to the students to supply the desire to make things and the curiosity to try out different possibilities.
    ARCH majors only; Open to fifth-year undergraduate, and third-year graduate or permission of instructor.
    Registration by Architecture department, course not available via web registration.
    This course satisfies the prerequisite requirement for Degree Project.
  • ARCH-2138

    DP SEM: NATURE & DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    This seminar will examine the complex relationship between nature and architecture and engage in debate regarding new typologies for ecological building. Typology is here understood as a conceptual understanding of the world at specific moments in time and the expression of that understanding in form. Discourse in architecture has in recent years been inundated by debates on how best to represent this new imperative.

    In the course we will read and interpret texts regarding nature, architecture, and ethical dimensions of ecological design. The texts will include classical treatises on nature, literary texts and current writings on ecology and design. The careful readings of texts and written responses to the material presented will inform and guide students in formulating their own questions and positions regarding a paradigm shift in current architectural debate.

    In addition to the readings, we will actively engage in making through direct observation and mappings of natural phenomena. We will study maps and mapping techniques from various cultures and geographical areas as historical documentation of the relationship between nature and settlement. Each student will then undertake a mapping project using various means as a way to explore process, movement, change, and representation. The mappings are seen as a tool to engage in a dialogue with natural phenomena and place as well as a means to clarify and address questions of new typologies in architecture.

    arch MAJORS ONLY;open to fifth-year, graduate or permission of instructor.
    Registration by Architecture department;course not available via web registration
    The Course satisfies the prerequisite requirement for Degree Project
  • ARCH-2312

    DP SEM: NAVIGATING THE CREATIVE PROCESS

    Credits: 3.00

  • ARCH-2175

    DP SEM: READING THE CITY

    Credits: 3.00

    Cities are complex artifacts shaped by powerful forces such as history, geography, culture, building and landscape. In turn, they become a stage for human drama, shaping the very life of people connected with them. This course understands cities as both physical and cultural constructions that can be subject to a variety of readings. Lectures, presentations, assignments and discussions will focus on individual cities--such as Havana, Vienna, Lisbon, Istanbul and Beijing--looking at their physical form and history, as well as some of their major cultural figures, materials, including maps, aerials, historic documents, fiction and non-fiction readings, theatre, film, visual arts, music, dance and food.
    ARCH majors only; Open to fifth-year UG and 3rd year Graduate.
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
    This course satisfies the prerequisite requirement for Degree Project.
  • ARCH-1519

    DP SEM: RETHINKING GREEN URBANISM

    Credits: 3.00

    As over half the world's population has come to live in cities, urbanization has moved to the center of the environmental debate. This course will provide an interdisciplinary engagement between Sociology and Architecture to reflect on the past, present and future of ecological urbanism. Co-taught by professors from Architecture and Liberal Arts, the seminar will interrogate the ways in which green urban design has been conceptualized to date. It will explore cutting edge contemporary debates around the future of the green urban project and ask students to think forward into the future. Students will have the opportunity to locate their own interests and Degree Project investigations within this discussion.
    Priority given to Arch Degree Project students (5th year UG and 3rd year Grad). Also listed as HPSS-S151 for non-architecture majors--by permission of the instructor.
  • ARCH-2156

    ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN I

    Credits: 3.00

    The study of basic concepts of Human Environmental Comforts. Inherent within 'physio-environ' considerations are principles of temperature, humidity, heat transfer, air movement, and hydrostatics. These principles will be studied in terms of their abstract physics and mathematics, through empirical benchmarking and as the basis for a design proposal that includes considerations of larger scale strategies as well as assemblies. Emphasis will be placed on the principles behind the technology, the behavioral characteristics and the qualities of the systems' operation considered in making building design decisions.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
  • ARCH-2178

    INTEGRATED BUILDING SYSTEMS

    Credits: 3.00

    Conceived as the culmination of the technologies sequence of courses, this course allows students to choose amongst the three instructor's differing approaches to the problem of conceiving technology holistically, in relation to a set of architectural criteria. The conceptual and technical aspects of building systems are considered and emergent environmentally-conscious technologies are emphasized for research and application.
    Prerequisites: All required technologies courses
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
  • ARCH-2154

    STEEL STRUCTURES

    Credits:

    This course reviews the role of metals in architecture, focusing on the fundamentals of steel analysis and design in architecture; and examines typical framing techniques and systems. Topics include construction issues, floor framing systems, column analysis and design, steel detailing and light gauge steel framing materials and systems. In addition the course introduces students to lateral force resistance systems in steel construction and exposes them to alternatives to steel such as aluminum and fiberglass. By the and of the course, students will be aware of the role of metals in architectural design and construction; design and detail simple steel structural systems; and proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department, course not available via web registration
  • ARCH-2152

    STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

    Credits: 3.00

    The basic content will be statics and strength of materials. The first portion will deal with force vectors, trusses, cross-sectional properties, and shear/moment diagrams, followed by stresses, strains, material applications and the analysis procedures necessary to compute structural behaviors. While the class format is mostly lecture, there will be ample time for discussion, in addition to group projects and field trips. This class is foundational to all future structural design classes such as Wood Structures and Steel Structures. The student will develop an intuitive understanding of structural behavior by studying various structural systems qualitatively under various loading conditions. The analysis of statically determinate trusses and frames will reinforce the intuitive understanding. Structural forces will be understood by tracing the loads (dead, live, wind, and seismic) through a building. They will be able to convert these loads into internal material stresses (axial, shear bending) for the purposes of proportioning members quantitatively. The relevant material sectional properties (such as moment of inertia and radius of gyration) will be learned through hands on bending and buckling experiments and later backed by quantitative analysis. A math test will be given prior to the first class to determine which students are required to attend a supplemental lecture class instructed by the teaching assistant. This course is a pre-requisite for Steel Structures, Wood Structures, and Concrete Structures.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture Department; Course not available via web registration.
  • ARCH-2101

    THE MAKING OF DESIGN PRINCIPLES

    Credits: 6.00

    This course, the first in a two semester sequence, explores design principles specific to architecture. Two interrelated aspects of design are pursued: 1) the elements of composition and their formal, spatial, and tectonic manipulation and 2) meanings conveyed by formal choices and transformations.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department; Course not available via web registration
  • ARCH-2108

    URBAN DESIGN PRINCIPLES

    Credits: 6.00

    The Urban Design Principles core studio introduces students to the city as a designed environment, giving them the tools to work through impressions, analysis and design operations as ways to understand "man's greatest work of art". Students confront the design of housing as a way to order social relationships and shape the public realm and attack the problems of structure, construction, access and code compliance in the context of a complex large-scale architectural design.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
Wintersession 2014
  • ARCH-W220

    *WINTERSESSION OFF-CAMPUS

    Credits: 3.00

    Various off-campus travel classes are offered through the department of Architecture to nonmajors. See the current Wintersession Publication for this year's offerings.
  • ARCH-2041

    ADVANCED RENDERING

    Credits: 3.00

    The goal of this course is to introduce students to advanced digital and hybrid rendering techniques alongside pertinent academic discourse on perception and visualization and their roles in relation to design. Students will be encouraged to develop a visual style appropriate to their chosen project(s) and consider their renderings as images and products in themselves, rather than as solely representations. This course is open to students from all disciplines with an interest in digital modeling and visualization. Students considering this course should have some previous experience with 3D modeling software.
    Students will be encouraged to arrive with a project of interest, whether or not it has been modeled previously. The class will focus on the production of images using V-Ray and Adobe Photoshop but will also discuss advanced modeling techniques to add detail in service of the final renderings.
    Open Sophomore and Above.
  • ARCH-2004

    ARCH DWG: MATERIALS & METHOD

    Credits: 3.00

    This course focuses on drawing as a means of visual inquiry and builds the skill to articulate both perceptual and conceptual visualizations. A variety of drawing media and processes heighten awareness of what we see and how we see it and achieve confident and intelligently articulated visual responses. This course is not just for students destined to become architects but for all who are keen on learning to express themselves visually using a variety of media including pencil, felt tip pens, watercolor, and digital photo collage. Each student will be developing a set of drawings that will be utilizing this method of mixed materials. The semester will start with a hand drafted drawing and will then focus on each students desire to work with and explore a number of other drawing materials.
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • ARCH-W204

    ARCHITECTONICS

    Credits: 3.00

    An introduction to the principles of architectural design beginning with a close examination of materials, forces and the human body. The examination will progressively widen in scope to include issues of form, space, structure, program and site. This condensed architectural studio is intended for freshmen and students outside the Division of Architecture and Design.
  • ARCH-2197

    DEGREE PROJECT RESEARCH

    Credits: 3.00

    Serious research and a specific preparation begins in this course, forming the theoretical basis for the creative development of the Degree Project (Spring, 6 credits). This is a period in which the nature of the work is clarified, a process is developed, possibilities are examined, and research and information gathering completed. The research from this course acts as an armature, establishing the attitude, objectives, and significance of the thesis as an exploration of architectural ideas, and forming the underpinnings for the work of the coming semester. The result of this effort, begun in the fall with DP prep and completed in the spring, is gathered together and reflected in the DP Book as part of the requirements for completion of Degree Project. The work is reviewed at the end of Wintersession; satisfactory completion of this course is a prerequisite for the Degree Project in the Spring semester.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department; course not available via web registration
    Schedule to be determined with Advisor
    Permission of instructor required
  • ARCH-2045

    DIGITAL + FABRICATION

    Credits: 3.00

    What is digital fabrication? Where and when is value made in a process of fabricating digital design. What part of the process is more important input or output?
    The goal of this class is to allow you explore what the term digital fabrication means in your discipline. Projects will root in your background and interest. Through the use of digital design tools (such as rhino, autoCAD, grasshopper, and more) we will create from your existing skill set, and move deeper into a digital realm. The class will give you working experience with the CNC Router, laser cutter, and 3D printer, as well as introductions to other digital fabrication tools around RISD.
    Estimated Cost of Materials: $200.00
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • ARCH-4705

    DIGITAL SENSE

    Credits: 3.00

    How can timeless human activities such as drawing and painting, relegated to the realm of the analogue, meaningfully engage 3D modeling platforms like Rhino/Grasshopper and contemporary output methods such as 3D printing? How can we learn to intuit in the realm of the virtual and what are the boundaries of this experience? This course will allow new ways of "seeing" and "feeling" and use a computational framework in the design process. Rather than take a conventional approach based on the technical aspects of a specific software program, students will be exposed to a rich diversity of potential work flows. The goal of this course is enhancing personal craft and technique through these digital tools while exploring new potential approaches to advanced technology.

    Also offered as TEXT-4705. Register for course in which credit is desired.
    Open to Sophomore and Above.
    Estimated material costs: To be determined (based on Model Shop Fee Structure)
  • ARCH-2003

    EXPERIMENTS WITH BODY AND SPACE

    Credits: 3.00

    Mastering the art of drawing is essential to becoming an architect. Nothing can replace the hand or the sketch. As hand drawing skills grow increasingly rare in architecture, students who invest in learning the art of drawing buildings are increasingly distinctive--and valuable. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of drawing architecture, beginning the journey with a simple line, studying the body in relation to space, and ending with designing a building. Through drawing and constructing physical models, students convey both the objective architectural environment and the subjective experience within. Final drawings will be executed through a combination of hand drafting, tone drawing, and multi-media collage.
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • ARCH-W202

    M.ARCH STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    Advanced Studio in Architecture.

    Please contact the Architecture Department via email at archdept@risd.edu for course description and to register.

    When space permits, this class may be available in a three credit version, ARCH W220, to undergraduates in majors outside of Architecture.
  • ARCH-2106

    MATERIAL POTENTIAL

    Credits: 3.00

    In this course we will research and discuss a variety of materials, their physical properties and their applications. Using furniture as our vehicle, we will explore how these materials might be utilized, beyond their original intent. We will also examine how the manipulation of these materials can create new ideas in furniture. In the first half of the course students will research, view, handle, and discuss a variety of materials. In the second half, students will model and construct, either a 1/4 scale model, or a full scale detail of a piece of furniture using a material selected from the research done in the first half of the course.
  • ARCH-W228

    MATH AND PHYSICS REVIEW

    Credits: 3.00

    This course is intended for architecture students to review and solidify the math and physics background needed to gain a good understanding of the required structural courses. Topics covered are designed to augment the fall Structural Analysis course and prepare students for easier learning in the upcoming spring's Wood Structures course. Problem sets, hands-on activities, and lectures will be tailored to the students' interests and review needs for better comprehension in future structures courses.
    Open to Graduate and Undergraduate Students
  • ARCH-2199

    PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP

    Credits: 3.00

    An eight week Professional Internship is required of all B.Arch and M.Arch candidates. The curriculum outline notes that the Internship occurs during the summer following the 3rd year of the B.Arch program and following the 1st year of the M.Arch and Advanced Transfer program. However, the Internship may be taken during any summer with Department approval. Waivers are available for students with prior professional experience matching the Department's requirements.
    Credits: Student chooses either no credits or three credits as above; grades are Pass or Fail.
    Does not count toward the max 36 credits allowed per year as part of regular tuition payments.
    To register, go to www.risdcareers.com (ArtWorks)
    Course not available via web registration.
Spring Semester 2014
  • ARCH-21ST

    ADVANCED STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    These studios, three of which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery on the first day of classes. Once assigned to an advanced studio, a student may not drop studio.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department, course not available via web registration
    Fee: Some advanced studio sections have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the registration lottery held in the Department.
  • ARCH-2142

    ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will develop one's ability to critically read and understand architecture through formal, geometric, tectonic and spatial analytic processes. Analysis acts as an intermediary between observation, expression, and understanding, offering deep insights into works of architecture. The course builds upon the processes introduced in Architectural Projection. Through various conceptual and representational frameworks, the issues of mapping-layers. Point of view, scale, morphology, topography and tectonics will be explored as part of a larger creative process, embracing visual imagination, communication and critique.

    Estimated Material Cost: $50.00
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department, course not available via web registration
  • ARCH-2102

    ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

    Credits: 6.00

    Design principles presented in the first semester are further developed through a series of projects involving actual sites with their concomitant physical and historic-cultural conditions. Issues of context, methodology, program and construction are explored for their possible interrelated meanings and influences on the making of architectural form.
    Estimated Material Cost: $55
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
  • ARCH-2155

    CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    Credits: 3.00

    This course reviews the fundamentals of concrete and masonry in architecture with a focus on materials, structural analysis and design. The analysis and design includes concrete structures, reinforced and pre-stressed concrete members, concrete foundations and reinforced masonry. The student will proportion concrete and masonry structures using ultimate strength design. The longer class time on Tuesday allows students to design, make a concrete mix and create a concrete object. By the end of the course, the students will be able to design and detail simple concrete and masonry systems such as footings, basement walls, beams and slabs; proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis; develop an understanding of proper detailing of architectural concrete and masonry veneers by understanding thermal movements, waterproofing, and construction techniques.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
  • ARCH-2198

    DEGREE PROJECT

    Credits: 9.00

    Under the supervision of a faculty advisor, students are responsible for the preparation and completion of an independent thesis project.
    Prerequisites: One of the degree project seminars. See footnotes on the curriculum sheet for a list of these classes or read the course descriptions in the "History and Theory" section which follows.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department, course not available via web registration
    Permission for this class is based on the student's overall academic record as well as their performance in Wintersession Degree Project Research. If the department recommends against a student undertaking the degree project, two advanced elective studios must be taken instead.
  • ARCH-2005

    ENGAGE! DESIGN WORKSHOP

    Credits: 3.00

    Architects are often called upon to facilitate charrettes and solicit community input in the design of a new space. Increasingly, designers are also engaging in projects that serve a public need rather than a private client. In this seminar, students will explore socially engaged architecture, participatory practices, and community-based design-build models. The class will become a laboratory for generating new modes of public engagement with the design process. The focus will be using design thinking to work with non-designers to solve problems in a variety of settings and contexts. The class will create and test dynamic activities for defining and contextualizing a design problem, brainstorming solutions, and prototyping. We will also explore the design of spaces ideally suited to fostering the design process. This work will be done in collaboration with Down City Design (http://www.downcitydesign.org).
    Class Level: Senior, 5th year
    Open to Arch majors, Non-majors by permission of instructor
  • ARCH-2158

    ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN II

    Credits:

    This equally distributed three part course will continue with the principles from "Physics", the application of electric energy, lighting and sound to building environs. Building technology continues to demand a larger percentage of the building's budget and thus should receive a greater degree of time and understanding by the Architect. Topics and principles to be included are: electronic generation, distribution, and building systems; electronic and communication systems; lighting fundamentals, design and control; and enviro-acoustical fundamentals, sound transmission, amplification, and absorption principles.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
  • LAEL-LE22

    MODERN ARCHITECTURE

    Credits: 3.00

    The course will focus on the diverse new roles encountered by the architect in the 20th century: form maker, administrator of urban development, social theorist, cultural interpreter, ideologue. Emphasis will be placed upon the increasing interdependence of architecture and the city, and the recurrent conflicts between mind and hand, modernity and locality, expressionism and universality.
    Major requirementfor Architecture majors
    Art History credit for Architecture majors
    Liberal Arts elective credit for nonmajors on a space available basis.
  • ARCH-2047

    OUTSIDE THE GUIDELINES

    Credits: 3.00

    This interdisciplinary workshop is understood primarily as a protected time and space within the Architecture Department for an improvisational investigation of space. It will be taught from year to year by a faculty from a rotating team of architects, visual artists, dancers, scientists, etc. who have invested their life's work in the medium of space. Questions regarding spatial phenomena, scale, place etc., will be addressed through the language that the visiting faculty's work employs: it could be a material language for an artist,a tectonic language for an architect, a language of movement for a dancer, mathematical for a scientist, or musical for a musician. The presumption is that there is a unique learning experience when students are asking questions not of their teacher, but with them; and that the individual faculty's discipline and nature can influence the content and improvisational development of each iteration of this workshop.
    All participants are invited to challenge what they think they know, to expand their language of practice, to extend their understanding of space beyond the culture, practices and lens of their own disciplines,to inquire by doing and to engage the purpose that the visiting faculty brings.
    Please contact the Architecture Department to learn more about this year's iteration of this course including information on the visiting faculty who will be teaching it.
    This workshop course provides an opportunity for the exploration of spatial concepts through observation and experience of phenomena. Using the infrastructure and environment of Providence as a laboratory, we will investigate how the ordinary can be transformed into the extraordinary and how the invisible can be rendered visible. Memory, time, light, vibration and metaphor will be examined in relation to the experience of architecture, installation and event.

    Students' participation and individual interests will shape the direction of the workshop. The idea is to investigate and invent, pushing the parameters of what is known by applying new ideas and materials. An ongoing series of experimental drawings, constructions and installation projects will be reinforced by discussions and selected readings. The semester will be punctuated with multimedia presentations and site visits. Instruction will be individualized, with an emphasis on group critiques. Guest speakers will share their work and challenge the process. Visiting critics will participate in final reviews.

    The course begins with individual projects and will encourage collaboration. Site-specific, ephemeral installations will focus on magnifying a sense of place and present.

    Students will record the environmental stimuli that inform our experience of place and time; Identify conditions, influences, and social forces that influence our built environment; consider spectacle, surprise and wonder as artistic devices; question your own aesthetics and instincts; engage in the work of significant figures in contemporary architecture and art; and develop critical skills that support and encourage the learning process.
  • ARCH-2191

    PRINCIPLES OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

    Credits:

    This is a course about becoming a licensed architect, a business professional and an active, engaged and responsible citizen. It is intended to help prepare students for the challenges and opportunities confronted by a life in Architecture. Lectures are organized around four themes: The architect as a trained and certified "Professional" in traditional and alternative careers; the architect as an operative in the world of business and commerce; the origins of architectural projects; and the detailed work performed through professional Architectural Contracts. Regular panels, composed of RISD alums and other allied professionals provide an external perspective on all elements of the course, and allow students the opportunity to direct discussion in ways appropriate to their needs.
    Major requirement; ARCH majors only.
    Registration by Architecture department.
    Course not available via web registration.
  • ARCH-2199

    PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP

    Credits: 3.00

    An eight week Professional Internship is required of all B.Arch and M.Arch candidates. The curriculum outline notes that the Internship occurs during the summer following the 3rd year of the B.Arch program and following the 1st year of the M.Arch and Advanced Transfer program. However, the Internship may be taken during any summer with Department approval. Waivers are available for students with prior professional experience matching the Department's requirements.
    Credits: Student chooses either no credits or three credits as above; grades are Pass or Fail.
    Does not count toward the max 36 credits allowed per year as part of regular tuition payments.
    To register, go to www.risdcareers.com (ArtWorks)
    Course not available via web registration.
  • ARCH-2120

    SOLAR DECATHLON

    Credits:

    Solar Decathlon Europe (SDE) is an international competition that challenges 20 collegiate teams to design and build sustainable homes powered exclusively by solar energy. The competition, which takes place at the gardens of Versailles between June 26 and July 15 of 2014, will challenge university teams in 10 contest categories including innovation, sustainability, and architecture. As a highly visible display of sustainable living practices, the SDE competition promotes renewable energy exploration and environmental responsibility. For more information about the competition, visit http://www.solardecathlon2014.fr/en.

    Our team represents three universities: the Rhode Island School of Design, Brown University, and the University of Applied Sciences in Erfurt, Germany. TECHSTYLE HAUS, as a project and a team, represents a new generation of problem solvers. Our cross-continental, interdisciplinary team, echoes our current global community, and proposes transformative solutions to our present environmental concerns.

    Harnessing each institutions' unique strengths, the team will build a completely solar-powered passive house made entirely of textiles. TECHSTYLE HAUS will be the first-ever Solar Decathlon entry to incorporate a complete textile enclosure. We will use textiles to challenge conventional architectural practices and approach the building industry with a fresh perspective. Textiles enable us to have a lightweight, affordable building enclosure that is easy to ship and assemble. TECHSTYLE HAUS will be built using Passivhaus strategies, widely accepted as the highest international standard for energy efficiency. As a result, the house to be affordable, innovative, and highly efficient, taking advantage of the unique capabilities of textiles.

    This seminar will focus on the development of custom details from full-scale prototyping and testing of advanced solar-energy systems. The course will involve intensive work in a controlled setting - we will work in a climate controlled warehouse, interact with sponsors and consultants, and continue the work from winter-session to assemble the project. This seminar is a key milestone leading up to May 1, when the project will ship to France for the competition. The Construction Drawings based on the Design Development Drawings will also be completed during this seminar.

    At the conclusion of the competition, Techstyle Haus will become a home for visitors of the Domaine de Boisbuchet, a not-for-profit design research institute, set up to host international design and architecture workshops situated in an idyllic estate in south west France.
    Elective, Open to Junior, Senior, Grads
    TEAMS
    Group 1 - Mechanical Core
    Group 2 - Structural Platform, Frame, and Exterior Enclosure
    Group 3 - Exterior Decks and Exhibition Devices
    Group 3 - Interior Skin, Curtains and Furniture
  • ARCH-H652

    SYNAGOGUES,CHURCHES,MOSQUES

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will focus on architectural buildings and remains of synagogues, churches, and mosques in Palestine from antiquity (the sixth century BCE) through the end of the Ottoman period (1917). Beyond the physical components of the houses of worship, and dealing with architectural, technological, and iconographic matters, we will investigate the spiritual and religious characteristics of the relevant structures. One of the goals will be to examine how these institutions influenced each other throughout the history of their architectural development.
    Students interested in this course must register for ARTH-H652 under the subject of History of Art and Visual Culture
  • ARCH-H631

    THE GOTHIC CATHEDRAL

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will study the architecture, sculpture, stained glass, and treasury objects (metalwork and manuscripts) which were the Gothic cathedral. Our study will begin with an examination of the reasons such work was created and explore the stylistic origins of the cathedral in northern France in the early 12th century. We will then look at the cathedral's subsequent development and modification in England, southern France, Italy, and Germany during the 12th through 15th centuries. Arch majors only
  • ARCH-2153

    WOOD STRUCTURES

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will review the fundamentals of wood in architecture with a focus on wood materials and construction systems and lumber and timber structural analysis and design. Work includes timber systems consisting of conventional framing trusses, laminates, built-up sections and connections. In addition, this course will review the principles of structural loads; gravity, lateral, live and dead. The concept of lateral resistance through standard wood framing systems will be explored. Manufactured lumber has become a major part of today's wood construction industry and the design and detailing of these materials will be explored in depth. By the end of the course, students will be aware of the role of wood materials in architectural design and construction and be able to design and detail simple Lumber and Timber structural systems. They will be able to proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis. This course will provide the student with a good understanding of the material and the common structural and architectural systems used in today's practice.
    Major Requirement: ARCH majors only.
    Registration by the Architecture Department.
    Course not available via web registration
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